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Hardy fruit bareing/ edible trees/ shrubs

Grey-Wolf
Posts: 51
Joined: Fri Aug 17, 2012 4:09 am
Location: The Bush

Hardy fruit bareing/ edible trees/ shrubs

Postby Grey-Wolf » Fri Sep 28, 2012 8:02 am

HI guys

I am just trying to find any plants that would survive with minimal to no maintenance? My area is very rocky, hot and dry. The plants need to be a sustainable food source at my BOL with maybe a fortnightly visit/ watering.

I thought of Olives, dates and quandongs. Other than that I am almost at a loss. Any help would be appreciated.
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FNQ'er-1
Posts: 405
Joined: Fri Aug 17, 2012 7:18 am
Location: North Qld - in the Land Down Under.

Re: Hardy fruit bareing/ edible trees/ shrubs

Postby FNQ'er-1 » Fri Sep 28, 2012 8:13 am

Bear in mind - that over on the Australian east coast I use vegitation to track down old pioneer dwellings/ruins. They are not indigenous to the area or country - logically some one planted them for a reason.
If I were you i would focus on native trees/vegetation of food source/medicinal value - most people will walk right by and not know what they missed - those that do know may end up being a handy ally.
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I'm old, tired and crotchety - what's your excuse???

Cares
Posts: 417
Joined: Wed Jun 13, 2012 5:20 am

Re: Hardy fruit bareing/ edible trees/ shrubs

Postby Cares » Fri Sep 28, 2012 1:48 pm

Think Mediterranean plants, trees, herbs like citrus, rosemary, olives, pinus pinea etc
Trees and many other plants are much better off to be watered infrequently and deeply as it encourages deep rooting. When they are watered often with a smaller amount of water they develop shallow roots and that causes them to suffer in droughts etc.
If your soil is very poor though you will need to apply plenty of compost, manure etc to keep them healthy.

We get so much rain at times that it actually washes the nutrients away a bit to quickly at times....I've got more than a green thumb, my whole hands are green and I love growing anything and everything ;)

Good luck and let us know how you get on :D
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steve1709
Posts: 2
Joined: Sat Sep 29, 2012 3:56 am

Re: Hardy fruit bareing/ edible trees/ shrubs

Postby steve1709 » Sun Sep 30, 2012 2:44 am

FNQ'er-1 wrote:Bear in mind - that over on the Australian east coast I use vegitation to track down old pioneer dwellings/ruins. They are not indigenous to the area or country - logically some one planted them for a reason.
If I were you i would focus on native trees/vegetation of food source/medicinal value - most people will walk right by and not know what they missed - those that do know may end up being a handy ally.


Hi FNQ'er-1. I see where you're coming from, but I am struggling to find enough local vegetation to be able to use in a diet. By that, I mean that it seem that almost all of our Aussie plants need quite a lot of processing before they can be eaten. If you know of some source of info that I can read that puts the types of plants and what has to be done to them in simple idiot proof terms (I'm not the sharpest chisel in the tool box), I would be really appreciative. Heck! I'm even having trouble getting my spuds to grow. They keep dying after a couple of months : (

Location = west of Gin Gin
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I have split off 150 ac of our bush block 150m above sea level. I need to sell it to finish my preps

FNQ'er-1
Posts: 405
Joined: Fri Aug 17, 2012 7:18 am
Location: North Qld - in the Land Down Under.

Re: Hardy fruit bareing/ edible trees/ shrubs

Postby FNQ'er-1 » Sun Sep 30, 2012 7:16 am

G'day Steve1709
Know exactly what your talking about. I like to keep things simple - have enough trouble using my computer - think they were a sick design joke to make people like me look even more stupid.
Mind you I can manage that quiet well myself with out any 'Bl--dy' electronic devises help. :)
Still can't figure out an easy way to email and post anything in a pdf formate. :(

Will PM you.
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I'm old, tired and crotchety - what's your excuse???

steve1709
Posts: 2
Joined: Sat Sep 29, 2012 3:56 am

Re: Hardy fruit bareing/ edible trees/ shrubs

Postby steve1709 » Mon Oct 01, 2012 3:31 am

G'day FNQ'er-1
Thanks for the reply (both here and the PMs). Tried to PM you but apparently I have to do my "apprenticeship" before I'm allowed to play with the grown ups. :)
I looked the site you sent. It looked pretty good and even though I have only just had a quick glance at 1 plant (bamboo) I reckon it'll be pretty useful. I am also trying to find out what I can pick, dig up, fall or whatever on my bush block that can be eaten if that helps you out with the stuff I'm after. I really appreciate your help. I also noticed that you have been looking at the recent earthquake stuff here in Oz. Well actually, we have a few hundred acres at the exact spot of a past earthquake. So, I guess by checking out where just west of Gin Gin there have been quakes, it'd be pretty easy to find where we actually are. Presently I am half way through trying to build our "last" house (we'll be pushing up daisies at our next address : ) ).
Bought a steel kit and my sons and I are attempting to get it up. Stuck for dough right now so only have it to lock up.
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I have split off 150 ac of our bush block 150m above sea level. I need to sell it to finish my preps

ICRCC
x 9

Re: Hardy fruit bareing/ edible trees/ shrubs

Postby ICRCC » Mon Oct 01, 2012 5:04 am

Welcome Steve1709 and greetings from Northern Ontario, Canada.
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Beacon
Posts: 31
Joined: Sun Aug 26, 2012 2:37 pm

Re: Hardy fruit bareing/ edible trees/ shrubs

Postby Beacon » Fri Oct 12, 2012 8:05 am

I would strongly suggest 'Wild Food Plants of Australia' by Tim Low he provides for different Australian habitats from seashore to arid zones. I've read about 1/4 of it so far (reading from cover to cover first then going back to specific areas of interest) and I'm really happy with it. It's full of pictures, descriptions and provides field notes on preparation etc...

He also does a bush medicines book.

I talk it with me when we go on family field trips etc and try to put knowledge in to experience...can't say I'm confident enough to eat platefuls of the stuff but already can identify 1-2 edible species when out...

Can't recommend it enough, you would be surprised what is edible...
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Beacon
Posts: 31
Joined: Sun Aug 26, 2012 2:37 pm

Re: Hardy fruit bareing/ edible trees/ shrubs

Postby Beacon » Fri Oct 12, 2012 8:07 am

Beacon wrote:I would strongly suggest 'Wild Food Plants of Australia' by Tim Low he provides for different Australian habitats from seashore to arid zones. I've read about 1/4 of it so far (reading from cover to cover first then going back to specific areas of interest) and I'm really happy with it. It's full of pictures, descriptions and provides field notes on preparation etc...

He also does a bush medicines book.

I talk it with me when we go on family field trips etc and try to put knowledge in to experience...can't say I'm confident enough to eat platefuls of the stuff but already can identify 1-2 edible species when out...

Can't recommend it enough, you would be surprised what is edible...


I'm thinking using what's in your environment would reduce the risk of looking like the second coming of the garden of Eden ;)
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Grillge
Posts: 36
Joined: Tue Sep 25, 2012 8:37 am
Location: South Australia

Re: Hardy fruit bareing/ edible trees/ shrubs

Postby Grillge » Sat Nov 10, 2012 6:41 am

Cares wrote:Think Mediterranean plants, trees, herbs like citrus, rosemary, olives, pinus pinea etc
Trees and many other plants are much better off to be watered infrequently and deeply as it encourages deep rooting. When they are watered often with a smaller amount of water they develop shallow roots and that causes them to suffer in droughts etc.
If your soil is very poor though you will need to apply plenty of compost, manure etc to keep them healthy.

We get so much rain at times that it actually washes the nutrients away a bit to quickly at times....I've got more than a green thumb, my whole hands are green and I love growing anything and everything ;)

Good luck and let us know how you get on :D


We get so much rain at times that it actually washes the nutrients away a bit to quickly at times....I've got more than a green thumb, my whole hands are green and I love growing anything and everything ;)

G'day ,look up bio charcoal or bio char on youtube, the Mayans used it to stop nutrients washing away, it also gives the bacteria in the soil a place to live so they aren't wash away either. You can make it yourself with a bit of work. Before I put my charcoal into the soil I get some compost in a bucket add water then put in the charcoal to absorb nutrients and bacteria, then dig it into the soil where it can be washed away. Hope this helps
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