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Best Kit for harvesting wood

General Preparedness Discussions
DJPrepper
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Canada

Best Kit for harvesting wood

Postby DJPrepper » Wed Aug 23, 2017 9:26 pm

What I am planning on for the LT : wood as the primary source of energy (Summers are short) and I will not run out of trees, ever (yes : Canada).

What are your recommendations for best :

1. Axe

2. Saw

3. Splitting Maul

4. outdoor stove

5. storage


I am actively seeking to source 3 + 4 at this time as I have 1 + 2 (although not the best solutions).

Suggestions / Recommendations / Critique welcome.
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Wayne
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Location: Cow Bay, Nova Scotia
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Re: Best Kit for harvesting wood

Postby Wayne » Thu Aug 24, 2017 12:33 pm

As far as manual tree felling and splitting, I'm partial to the Fiskars chopping axe (X15) and the Fiskars X25 Splitting Axe.

Fiskars has various models to choose from depending on the length that is the best size for you. Generally speaking, the correct size is determined by grabbing the axe handle immediately below the head, hold it vertically with an outstretched arm (sideways to your body), then rotate the handle so that it's held along your arm. The bottom of the axe handle should extend to the top of your shoulder (not past). The weight of the head shouldn't be heavier than you can lift it to a vertical position with one hand. To check this, hold your arm down next to your body grabbing the axe handle. Keeping your elbow next to your body, raise your forearm and axe outward to the vertical position.

For trees under a foot in diameter I often have used a Fiskars 30 inch bow saw. They don't jam in wet wood, are inexpensive and work quickly. They are also ideal to remove large branches when it's not ideal to use a pruning saw.

Fiskars axes come with a lifetime warranty. There's not much of a chance that you'll ever have to replace it, as they're pretty much indestructible.

As far as stoves are concerned, there are several threads on various types and their uses on this site. Many of us have several different stoves (wood, propane, alcohol, multi-fuel, etc.) so if you're only choosing one and have a supply of wood, that would be my choice. I'll be interested to see the comments of others...
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DJPrepper
Posts: 38
Joined: Tue Aug 15, 2017 9:41 pm
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Canada

Re: Best Kit for harvesting wood

Postby DJPrepper » Thu Aug 24, 2017 9:28 pm

Wayne wrote:Generally speaking, the correct size is determined by grabbing the axe handle immediately below the head, hold it vertically with an outstretched arm (sideways to your body), then rotate the handle so that it's held along your arm. The bottom of the axe handle should extend to the top of your shoulder (not past). The weight of the head shouldn't be heavier than you can lift it to a vertical position with one hand. To check this, hold your arm down next to your body grabbing the axe handle. Keeping your elbow next to your body, raise your forearm and axe outward to the vertical position.


Thanks - that is really useful to know.

When I got the Axe, I hadn't checked this at all.

Will pay more attention for the next purchase.
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Clarence
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Location: Ottawa area, Ontario
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Re: Best Kit for harvesting wood

Postby Clarence » Mon Jan 15, 2018 5:16 am

For wood handled axes, check out the grain of the wood. Look at the end of the handle. It may be hard if they have a lot of paint on it but, the grain should be in line with the blade/ straight. The more the lines/ grain are angled/ 20,30,45 degrees, the more likelyhood of it eventually breaking.

If by outdoor stove you mean outdoor furnace, I recommend you look at central boiler. Mine was able to accept 4 foot logs with ease. I could load it up in dead of winter Friday night and come home Sunday at five PM and have plenty of hot coals for reload. Water temp in boiler was 180 and it may have dropped tp 140-160. Great unit. Needs electricity to run water from it to the inside of your home heating distribution system but it has a ton of benefits like no premium for insurance, less splitting and cutting / throw whole
Logs in, four footers, branches... house is radiant hot water, but they work for forced air as well
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scrounger
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Canada

Re: Best Kit for harvesting wood

Postby scrounger » Fri Jan 19, 2018 11:54 pm

If you are near a Husqvarna dealer stop in. Some of them carry the Husqvarna axe line. Wood or composite handles. Usually made under contract by decent Swedish makers. At the very least you can handle some good axes and see what feels right.

Here is a link to a manual to keep your choppers working..

http://www.bchmt.org/documents/educatio ... oGrind.pdf
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Miotornut
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Jan 20, 2018 5:11 am
Australia

Re: Best Kit for harvesting wood

Postby Miotornut » Sat Jan 20, 2018 6:14 am

Thank you for your advice I'm thinking of cutting my backyard, but it's so big. To be planted to other.
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Danux
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Canada

Re: Best Kit for harvesting wood

Postby Danux » Mon Feb 12, 2018 6:21 am

The only time I use an axe or hatchet is to split. My bow saw is always my first cutting tool. I've only ever purchased cheapo Cantire bows, they seem to work. That ripping blade makes short work of all but the thickest pieces of wood. When I do swing an axe, it's an Estwing 26", but then, I have no really large pieces of trunk to split. I've been eyeballing "Wilton" axes, lately, though. They advertise as having unbreakable handles, I'll likely go that way if I decide I need a maul.
http://www.wiltontools.com/us/en/view-series/b-a-s-h-splitting-mauls/SpltMaul

Also considered a hydraulic splitter, using hand-powered rams. Not convinced it is superior to a wedge or maul, though.

I've also got a Kindling Cracker, which hasn't migrated to camp yet. Seems like a good idea, takes the sharp edge out of the motion. I've given it as a gift, and the old folks like it better than swinging the axe.
https://www.kindlingcracker.com/

Virtually all my splitting is done with an Estwing Fireside Friend, though. My local supply of wood is just not worthy of a big axe.

.
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