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TGIF ~ Alternative Medicines ~

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Knuckle
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TGIF ~ Alternative Medicines ~

Postby Knuckle » Fri Jan 16, 2015 6:07 pm

Seems this is likely to be a touchy subject, so I'd prefer folks to keep this thread about the topic only. In this way, it helps those collecting data on this subject to have any easier time doing so.

Thanks ~ Knuckle ~


Methods of Using Plants for Medicine

Poultice: a poultice can simply be crushed leaves or other plant parts, possibly heated, applied to a wound or sore either directly or wrapped in cloth.
A poultice can be made into a paste by grinding or crushing the plant parts and mixing with water - usually heated before or during the mixing. You can thicken the paste by using agents such as flour or oatmeal. The mixture is then held to the affected area with cloth or gauze.

Infusion or Tea: the preparation of medicinal herbs for internal or external application. You [lace a small quantity of the herb in a container, pour hot water over it, and let it steep(covered or uncovered) before use.

Decoction: the extract of a boiled down or simmered herb or root. You add herb leaf or root to water. You bring them to a sustained boil or simmer to draw their chemicals into the water. The average ratio is about 28 to 56 grams (1 or 2 ounces) of herb to .5 litre of water.

Expressed Juice: liquids or saps squeezed from the plant material and either applied to the wound or made into another medicine.

Tincture: a tincture is the infusion of dried, powdered or fresh herbs in alcohol, glycerine or vinegar. The idea of a tincture is not to produce intoxication, but to provide and preserve the strongest form of the herb's properties.
To produce a tincture, place the herbs inside a glass jar and pour enough to cover the herbs completely. Continue to pour alcohol (rum or vodka works well, otherwise vinegar or glycerine) to fill the jar half way. Sore in a cool dark place for up to 2 weeks. Shake the jar at least once a day. After 2 weeks, strain the tincture thru cheesecloth or muslin and store. Tinctures remain potent for up to 2 years.
Most tincture remedies call for one tablespoon to be consumed at mealtimes.
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Knuckle
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Re: TGIF ~ Alternative Medicines ~

Postby Knuckle » Fri Jan 16, 2015 6:27 pm

How About Setting Some Parameters

Now I know there is alot of research done on this topic and this thread could become easily filled with tons of technical data showing the validity of such research. How about instead we work on the "KISS" theory as I never seem to find such a book when I'm researching this subject.

What I've been doing is trying to narrow down my data to list things that grow outside my door mostly. Yet this list becomes small and the cures become "iffy" when researching under such defined parameters. Thus I have accepted that I should consider that which can be purchased easily in your grocery stores usually as basic household items. Kitchen spices seem to cover alot of such home remedies and since we often don't use them in our daily cooking, maybe we have now found a new place for them to reside.

It's those items that are found in health food stores that I'd prefer to avoid here as they can be better covered in another thread and it will hopefully keep this one more simple. Also they require far more out of pocket expense which limits many folks in playing along too.

I'm hoping my gardener friends will join in as this is obviously more up their alley than mine. This aspect isn't set in stone so challenge my ideas here as whatever makes this thread better is what we should go with.
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Knuckle
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Re: TGIF ~ Alternative Medicines ~

Postby Knuckle » Fri Jan 16, 2015 6:34 pm

What I present is taken from a collection of places as each seemed to have their own defining points that made up the following. All I did was reduce the content to that which is useful to our needs and discard the rest....


Dandelion

Dandelions rank in the top 4 green vegetables in overall nutritional value, out of all vegetables, including grains, seeds and greens, as tied for 9th best. dandelions are nature's richest green vegetable source of beta-carotene, from which Vitamin A is created, and the third richest source of Vitamin A of all foods, after cod-liver oil and beef liver! They also are particularly rich in fiber, potassium, iron, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and the B vitamins, thiamine and riboflavin, and are a good source of protein. They are also rich in micronutrients such as copper, cobalt, zinc, boron, and molybdenum, as well as Vitamin D.

Vitamin A is important in fighting cancers of epithelial tissue, including mouth and lung;

* Potassium rich foods, in adequate quantities, and particularly in balance with magnesium, helps keep blood pressure down and reduces risks of strokes;

* Fiber fights diabetes, lowers cholesterol, reduces cancer and heart disease

risks, and assists in weight loss. High fiber vegetables take up lots of room, are low in calories, and slow down digestion so the food stays in the stomach longer and you feel full longer;

* Calcium in high concentrations can build strong bones and can lower blood pressure;

* B vitamins help reduce stress.

Dandelion is used for:

• loss of appetite, upset stomach, intestinal gas, gallstones, joint pain, muscle aches, eczema, and bruises.
• Dandelion is also used to increase urine production and as a laxative to increase bowel movements.
• It is also used as skin toner, blood tonic, and digestive tonic.
• Some people use dandelion to treat infection, especially viral infections, and cancer.
• people who had their tonsils removed recovered faster if they ate soup containing dandelion
• to relieve arthritis like pains
• water extract of dandelion leaves, administered orally, because of its high potassium content, replaced serum potassium electrolytes lost in the urine, eliminating such side effects common with severe potassium depletion, hepatic coma in liver patients, circulatory collapse, and transmission through mothers' milk
• A doubling of bile output with leaf extracts, and a quadrupling of bile output with root extract. Bile assists with the emulsification, digestion and absorption of fats, in alkalinizing the intestines and in the prevention of putrefaction. This could explain the effectiveness of dandelion in reducing the effects of fatty foods (heartburn and acid indigestion)
• people that survived cancer claim eating dandelion salads as the reason
• The leafís white, milky sap removes warts, moles, pimples, calluses, and sores, and soothes bee stings and blisters.


Dandelion Root Coffee

The roasted roots are largely used to form Dandelion Coffee, being first thoroughly cleaned, then dried by artificial heat, and slightly roasted till they are the tint of coffee, when they are ground ready for use. The roots are taken up in the autumn, being then most fitted for this purpose. The prepared powder is said to be almost indistinguishable from real coffee, and is claimed to be an improvement to inferior coffee, which is often an adulterated product. Of late years, Dandelion Coffee has come more into use in this country, being obtainable at most vegetarian restaurants and stores. Formerly it used occasionally to be given for medicinal purposes, generally mixed with true coffee to give it a better flavor. The ground root was sometimes mixed with chocolate for a similar purpose. Dandelion Coffee is a natural beverage without any of the injurious effects that ordinary tea and coffee have on the nerves and digestive organs. It exercises a stimulating influence over the whole system, helping the liver and kidneys to do their work and keeping the bowels in a healthy condition, so that it offers great advantages to dyspeptics and does not cause wakefulness.

If you want a hot beverage simply make dandelion coffee. Dandelion coffee is made from the root of the plant. Gather your roots in the fall or in the early spring before the plant blooms. Scrub the unpeeled roots with a stiff brush. Use the big part of the root for a vegetable. It's the skinny side roots that you need to dry, grind, and roast for you brew. Simply dry the roots in an oven (150 degrees) until they are brittle and snap easily. Then roast them at about 375 degrees for 15-20 minutes or until they are dark brown inside. Now grind them in the blender until they look like coffee. For a steaming cup of dandelion coffee use about one teaspoon of ground root to a cup of boiling water. This brew will have a flavor all it’s own, vaguely chocolaty and pleasing.

Harvesting:

• Dandelion leaves are at their best when they've just emerged.
• Collect dandelion leaves in early spring, when they're the tastiest, before the flowers appear. Harvest again in late fall. After a frost, their protective bitterness disappears. Dandelions growing in rich, moist soil, with the broadest leaves and largest roots, are the best. Select the youngest individuals, and avoid all plants with flowers. Some people eat the greens from spring to fall, when they're very bitter. Others boil out the summer bitterness (and water-soluble vitamins) out in two changes of water. It ís all a matter of preference.
• You can also eat dandelion flowers, or use them to make wine. Collect them in a sunny meadow, just before mid-spring, when the most flowers bloom. Some continue to flower right into the fall. Use only the flower's yellow parts. The green sepals at the flowerís base are bitter.
• The taproot is edible all year, but is best from late fall to early spring. Use it as a cooked vegetable, especially in soups. Although not as tasty as many other wild root vegetables, It ís not bad.

In Meals:

Dandelion greens are wonderful in salads, sautÈed or steamed. They taste like chicory and endive, with an intense heartiness overlying a bitter tinge.

People today shun bitter flavorsótheyíre so conditioned by overly sweet or salty processed food. But in earlier times, we distinguished between good and bad bitterness. Mixed with other flavors, as in a salad, dandelions improve the flavor.
I also love sautÈing them for about 20 minutes with onions and garlic in olive oil, adding a little home-made wine before they're done. If you're not used to the slight bitterness, cook them with sweet vegetables, especially sliced carrots and parsnips. Boiling dandelions in one or more changes of water makes them milderóa good introduction if you're new to natural foods. Early spring is also the time for the crownógreat sautÈed, pickled, or in cooked vegetable dishes.

The flowers add color, texture, and an unusual bittersweet flavor to salads. You can also sautÈ them, dip them in batter and fry them into fritters, or steam them with other vegetables. They have a meaty texture that contrasts with other lighter vegetables in a stir-fry dish or a casserole. A Japanese friend makes exceptionally delicious traditional dandelion flower pickles, using vinegar and spices.
Pre-boiling and changing the water, or long, slow simmering mellows this root. Sweet vegetables best complement dandelion roots. Sauteing the roots in olive oil also improves them, creating a robust flavor. A little Tamari soy sauce and onions complete this unusual vegetable side dish.

Dandelion leaf infusion also good at dinner time. Its bitter elements encourage the production of proper levels of hydrochloric acid and digestive enzymes. All the digestive glands and organs respond to this herbís stimulation. Even after the plant gets bitter, a strong infusion, is rich in vitamins and minerals, and helps people who are run-down. Even at its most bitter (Taraxacum come from Arabic and Persian, meaning "bitter herb"), it never becomes intolerably so, like golden seal and gentian.

Caution: Ragweed allergy: Dandelion can cause allergic reactions when taken by mouth or applied to the skin of sensitive people. People who are allergic to ragweed and related plants
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Knuckle
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Re: TGIF ~ Alternative Medicines ~

Postby Knuckle » Sat Jan 17, 2015 7:34 pm

The Alder Tree:

The alder likes to grow near water, rivers, streams and lakes and is found in company with willows and birch trees. It is a member of the birch family, Betulaceae. Found mainly in Eastern Canada.

- alder leaves in your shoes will prevent your feet from getting tired

- rheumatism: sleep on a bed of alder leaves it will help.

- Leaves reduce swelling and prevents infection when chewed and applied to a wound

- helpful in easing pain of swollen breast or burning and aching feet

Alternatively a hot poultice can be made from the leaves and applied to relieve inflammation. A decoction made from the bark will reduce swelling and bruising.

The inner bark of alder can be boiled with vinegar and used to clean teeth, remove head lice and get rid of scabies. A tisane can be made from 1 heaped tablespoon of leaves to a pint of boiling water and this can be used for skin problems and irritations, and to cure herpes.

Decoctions from the leaves or bark (boil leaves or bark in water until the water has reduced by half) can be used as a gargle for sore throats, and can be applied to wounds to prevent infection and promote healing. This can also be used on burns.

Bark and leaves may also be chewed by a cat with a toothache to reduce pain, swelling, and aid in preventing general complications.
Use leaves for swelling. Especially
Should be avoided if pregnant

Dermatological aid - A poultice of moistened, heated leaves can reduce swelling and help heal wounds or skin ulcers.

Gynecological aid - The leaves are used in poultices to dry up breast milk.

Toothache:

Make a tincture of dried bark, catkins and cones (fresh bark can make one vomit)
Take two dropperfulls 3-4 times a day.
The ache will be gone in 3 hours, swelling gone in a day and gum sensitivity in two days.

A strong decoction of the article is a useful wash in scrofulous and venereal ulcers, and in chronic ophthalmia; and the same has been used as a popular drink in sub-acute diarrhea, and will be found a good injection in leucorr
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Alder trunk and roots
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Goldie
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Re: TGIF ~ Alternative Medicines ~

Postby Goldie » Sat Jan 17, 2015 11:09 pm

?? what about Aloe Vera Plants ??

I am going to get some in spring and start growing indoors . There is probably some other
plants we could grow ourselves indoors or in our gardens even if the ones outside are wild we
could transplant some near out home ?

I already grow peppermint perennial in my garden , which is good for stomach problems.
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Knuckle
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Re: TGIF ~ Alternative Medicines ~

Postby Knuckle » Sun Jan 18, 2015 12:26 am

Goldie wrote:?? what about Aloe Vera Plants ??

I am going to get some in spring and start growing indoors . There is probably some other
plants we could grow ourselves indoors or in our gardens even if the ones outside are wild we
could transplant some near out home ?

I already grow peppermint perennial in my garden , which is good for stomach problems.


Hey Goldie;

Sure thing! If we can even grow them indoors, they are still a viable alternative in bad times. It's more likely ones like yourself would know just how to keep them alive too in harsher times. All that I'm wanting folks to maybe do is keep it simple so others will feel that this aspect is doable and do it too.

Seems many of us in this forum are older and could even gain from having such items to barter and trade in an economy where the young would have most of the jobs available. So having medicinal plants as a renewable resource would go a long ways in providing for oneself where others won't know how. I'd say all you farm folk will have a leg up on many in this way.

My hope is that I just start a thread like this and others like yourself jump in as I'm running out of ideas quick on this subject. I'm even hoping Cares and OldTime Gardner also peek in and start up as they seem quite knowledgeable in this regard. I wish Mrs. Prep would jump back in again too as she sure knew alot on such things.
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Goldie
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Joined: Thu Nov 07, 2013 8:41 pm
Location: Ontario, Canada
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Re: TGIF ~ Alternative Medicines ~

Postby Goldie » Sun Jan 18, 2015 2:47 am

Aloe Vera plant thrives on neglect. Easy to grow inside
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Debbie
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Canada

Re: TGIF ~ Alternative Medicines ~

Postby Debbie » Wed Oct 04, 2017 5:41 pm

I have also found a natural faster solution for toothaches also. I mix equal parts baking soda, diatomaceous earth, and coconut oil together and call this my toothache cream/tooth paste! This mixture works in about ten minutes and kills the bad bacterium on contact.
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