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Clay cookware

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Sylvie2674
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Clay cookware

Postby Sylvie2674 » Sun Oct 02, 2016 4:21 pm

So, I was flipping through the Canadian tire flyer yesterday and saw a clay roaster. They are regularly priced at $169.99, however, this one is on sale for $49.99.
My questions are the following.
Would they be a good idea to have along with your cast iron cookware and Dutch oven?
I would most likely use mine on or in a coal bed, I was also thinking a ground solar oven may conduct the heat better with a clay roaster instead of my cast iron Dutch oven. Would that be the case?
Are they easy to make?
Does anyone here have any experience with making clay pots and cookware? If so would I need a clay oven to make it set, or could I just use my oven?
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I prep for my daughters, for they are our future.
I prep for the short and long term. Everyday I strive to learn something new.
I prep for community. For in the long run each of us need one another.

morningcoffee
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Location: Edmonton
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Re: Clay cookware

Postby morningcoffee » Mon Oct 03, 2016 4:35 pm

Hi Sylvie,
Some of the things that I like about my ceramic coated roasting pans: easy to clean the outside if they happen to run over, I can brown and sear in the same pan on any heat source (induction, gas, electric or BBQ) without worry, no pre-soaking required (I don't always have the time or planning ahead far enough to let them soak for hours), they achieve a lovely patina that I think enhances the flavours of gravies or sauces. I have a tagine (which is an oddly shaped clay baker) which gets little use because of the time it takes to get it prepared. It can't go from cold to hot too quickly or it will crack. It can't easily be cleaned on the outside and it can be really fragile. I don't have the expensive Le Cruset branded coated roasters, but have found the Lagostina or Cusinart ones are durable and do a great job. I don't want pans or roasters that can't be stored easily and without getting everything else "grungy" in my kitchen drawers. If you end up storing a clay baker outside because it is dirty from the coals you have to have somewhere to warm them up before you can start cooking. Just my thoughts. On a positive note they do make very moist roasted vegetables and meat but for my money it will be the easier care/use items that I go to time and time again. I don't know whether they are better with heat conduction as I have found the coated cast iron heats up very quickly (on the induction it is hot before I turn around) and they retain heat well. I have no experience making pottery (if I did I would be making fermentation weights for my larger canning jars).
Good luck on your decision!
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"It's better to look ahead and prepare than to look back and regret"

Sylvie2674
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Joined: Wed Mar 02, 2016 4:34 pm
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Re: Clay cookware

Postby Sylvie2674 » Mon Oct 03, 2016 11:12 pm

Thank you very much Mornningcoffee.
That is excellent information given. I am not quite ready to make a decision yet as to what maybe more practical or better to cook with, but I am now better informed.
I have to say I love my cast iron cookware and I am definitely not ready to give them up. However, this does give another option for cookware..
0 x
I prep for my daughters, for they are our future.
I prep for the short and long term. Everyday I strive to learn something new.
I prep for community. For in the long run each of us need one another.


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