Page 1 of 1

Storing food across temperature extremes?

Posted: Thu Sep 07, 2017 7:36 pm
by Danux
Is it possible to store,say, dehydrated/freeze-dried food in an uninsulated seacan in Canada? I'd say the temperatures would vary between -40C in winter, to +40C in the summer. How much variation in temperature can, say, canned food take? Like a can of beans, for instance.

.

Re: Storing food across temperature extremes?

Posted: Thu Sep 07, 2017 8:48 pm
by term0shad
Never let can stuff freeze or get to hot. If by chance there bacterial stuff in it. Odds are will make you sick. I would say 5 Celsius to plus 20. Safe zone.

Re: Storing food across temperature extremes?

Posted: Thu Sep 07, 2017 9:20 pm
by morningcoffee
Freeze-dried food can be stored at temperatures up to 23C safely and is not bothered by freezing. Canned food should be stored in a cool dark location. High acid foods such as canned tomatoes and canned fruit should be used within about 18 months and low acid (most vegetables) are good for 2-5 years. Your uninsulated sea can may not be the best place to store your food supply. A dugout style root cellar would be another choice if you stay below frostline.

Re: Storing food across temperature extremes?

Posted: Fri Sep 08, 2017 1:37 pm
by Danux
A root cellar is a good idea, I'll have to find the time to make one. Is there government data on frost lines in Canada, that you are aware of? I've often wondered what the temperatures are, beneath me, as I dig deeper - how deep would you have to dig, in order to keep an earth-sheltered house habitable without an additional source of heat, for instance.

.

Re: Storing food across temperature extremes?

Posted: Fri Sep 08, 2017 3:20 pm
by term0shad
Thats called thermal heating expensive as hell. Frost linei n canada most time is 4 ft frost line. But depending on whats below you it can be 6 to 8 ft.. goggle the area you live and go to your county page.

Re: Storing food across temperature extremes?

Posted: Tue Sep 12, 2017 11:51 am
by Adagio
I agree with the above. A root cellar is the way to go.

Re: Storing food across temperature extremes?

Posted: Tue Sep 12, 2017 9:15 pm
by DougM
I saw a native made shelter for "bad times" on an island. It was basically a slit trench covered with logs and rubble. With 3 feet of snow on top, winter clothes and body heat you would live. This was in deep bush 50+ air miles from anything.

Re: Storing food across temperature extremes?

Posted: Sat Sep 16, 2017 1:28 pm
by Danux
I've been looking at dugout homes that sound similar to the native shelters you're describing. The idea seems sound, although I would be concerned about the place filling with water as it warmed up. Most of the dugouts I see are built into hillsides, only places lacking hills seem to use a hole.

.

Re: Storing food across temperature extremes?

Posted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 4:18 am
by Clarence
Underground or hillsides will get wet in spring, when raining a great deal. Would have hated to be in one this wet summer. Can we say soggy and miserable. I guess if designed with a waterproof roof and walls, with drainage all around and then covered with earth they would work very well on the side of a hill. Face west or south and get added heat.

Re: Storing food across temperature extremes?

Posted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 4:23 am
by Clarence
Note to my previous post. Geared more to a shelter than storage for food. I wouldn’t store food underground unless it was fully dry, cool and rodent free.idealy under or very near home