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TGIF ~ The Mobile Home as your BOV ~

(Wilderness/Urban Survival), (BOB/BOL/INCH/ETC), (Shelters)
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cernunnos5
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Re: The Mobile Home as your BOV

Postby cernunnos5 » Thu Jul 24, 2014 2:54 pm

A couple more thoughts before I get onto the day. 6 new chicks have been born this year. That means we can begin thinning out the older chickens. One breed kept squishing to death the chicks (Killed a half dozen) so it went to the pot to save one.

I wouldn't go with trailers again unless it was one of the small Airstreams, much smaller Bolers or a similar. They are expensive but there is a reason they are collectors items. One of the big airstreams is perfect for a permanent retreat home. All aluminum construction means none of that rot so it should last forever (and not burn easily). A small Boler trailer can be handled by most vehicles. Its only where you sleep and keep your stuff dry. Not where you live (Same with the vans). Life is happening...outside.

We have two trailers on the property at the moment. A small antique aluminum one that I hope to rebuild at some point. Its not road worthy at this point but could easily be pulled by the ford ranger without wrecking the truck. We got it as a spare cabin for a guest that wanted their space. Also, incase our house burns, we have a place to sleep wile sorting out what to do next.
One of my team members had planned to sell his rather large trailer now that his retreat cabin is livable. It was just starting to develop the problems we mentioned above. Instead of selling it...he decided to pre place it at our property. Now he has a back up to his back up plan and has provider for us the ability to house several more people at our place. He greatly increased our ability to house our MAG. The darned thing has the foldout beds to sleep 10...though realistically, that means it could house one of our families. Or 4 WWOOFers. Yay team. Its in the sun where the wind can get to it...and it needed to be dried out and sun baked to deal with the moisture problems...since it was originally parked in a shady enclosed place. Now, we need to find a woodstove for it and get a proper roof built on it. None of my survival advice is theory (or , 'If the shit hits the fan', I will do this, wanking). We live it...so we can find out the problems before our lives depend on it.
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Re: The Mobile Home as your BOV

Postby Knuckle » Thu Jul 24, 2014 3:21 pm

I agree that propane is not the way to heater your RV, especially in the winter. Propane's natural bi-product is moisture and it quickly accumulates on your windows first and everything else too in certain conditions. Wood heat is dry yet proper ventilation is critical in small spaces, so care must be given when determining what method of heat you'll use(electric heat is not an issue). If in doubt during a temporary situation, just wind down a window a little. The biggest deterrent from propane though is the cost of it.

Wood Stoves

I installed a small ice shack stove in my first bus but used it little as small electric heaters were less work. Yet wish to build a small stove to use in the RV and considered a temporary system the best route as it could be set aside when not required otherwise. As I am a firm believer in dual purpose items, I would like to also cook with this stove too and design it to be used in other things such as trailers and even tents.

I have researched rocket stove designs quite a bit. There are so many designs and concepts on the web to choose from and it is a topic many of you might find interesting. They burn very hot and efficiently so therefore use less wood vs the amount of heat they create. I just found this demo showing a really good design and how it captures alot of the heat usually goes out your chimney. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oVoJ14qMvPs

There are many versions of this stove concept but they all have a draft that starts at the bottom to stoke the flames for an efficient burn. I have started 2 designs, 1 small and the other large. viewtopic.php?f=74&t=4925&p=54102&hilit=rocket+stove#p54102 . (I haven't gotten too much farther on these stoves since but will post the finished products when I do).

The nice thing I like about the small rocket stoves is that they burn kindling and produce heat like it was a small log. This allows you to use wood that dries quickly and often burn brush and dead branches without stripping the area of trees as often. Less effort (and mess) is required as swede saw is only required for bucking up instead of a chainsaw and less splitting too. The safest method would be to create a small separate pipe to feed fresh air from outside to the draft on the stove. This is how a furnace is set up in a house so as not to steal all the oxygen. It is not a factor in a tent as they leak air in everywhere but critical in trailers and RVs.

Here are some good designs I like too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=45cGRzl4hnQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aki1IsFlSpw
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nvlOelD5HOE
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-OTym69w_j4



Kerosene Heaters

This is another good option, especially if your RV is running on diesel. They are very efficient and clean burning these days but again require careful consideration in their use in small places. The downfall I find is that they don't have dual purpose and cost money to run compared to FREE fuel. :lol:
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Re: The Mobile Home as your BOV

Postby cernunnos5 » Thu Jul 24, 2014 9:59 pm

Called on account of rain.

Lets get to the pros and cons of buses. Absolutely fantabulous vehicle. I would never get another one though accept to use as a permanent storm proof green house. These are created to move our most precious cargo. They are rated to roll over capability. If it rolls on its side, winch it back up and drive away. Plenty of room and that big steal, curved roof causes all water to easily flow off of it. One to 2 and a half feet clearance in most parts. Reliable engine. Paint over any rust and its structure should last for ever. You can buy them cheap because school municipalities are generally only allowed to use them for ten years and they have plenty of maintenance during that period.
Now the cons. The biggest one is that any repairs require a heavy duty mechanic and the tools to go with it. I wouldn't be able to change my own tires. Repairs are expensive. Take what you would pay to repair your car...and add a zero. If you are going up to a tour bus, add another zero to that. The big problem is that, as a commercial vehicle, they are designed to be run 5 days a week. Let it sit for any amount of time and you will start having problems soon after. Let it sit for a year and a half and its done. There is a lot of prejudices of buses. Some RV parks wont allow school buses. In Alberta, (the best place to get them) you cannot get cheap RV insurance unless it has been factory converted. So, that would be 5000$ a year as a commercial vehicle instead of the few hundred it should be. Hippy hatred may have the cops violate your rights more freely or some drunk logger put a round through it. On the plus side, you can ram it into his pickup truck, wrap it around a tree and drive away giggling like a school girl. A bus on your property will probably have a neighbour call a bylaw officer. Same goes, if you are squatting in a city. You stand out like a mardi gra float and will be ticketed the fastest. The windows are bad for letting weather in and will need some re working. The height sometimes snags on trees or the rear overhang can get you caught up on ditches. Because of their size, its really hard to get them turned around on logging roads. I had to back up 3-4 miles once and then do a twenty point turn...and that was with the short bus. This had something to do with 3 perky bisexual hippy chicks. They were a riot but I barely survived them. Never again....on the bus, I mean. If I had to do it all again, I would have gone with a municipal workers van (Far lower profile and way easies to get around. I could sleep on any street). I would hang a ladder on it for the disguise, and a short covered matching trailer for the Bike. I'd probably pass on the three hippy chicks as well. That was a story of survival in itself.
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Re: The Mobile Home as your BOV

Postby Knuckle » Fri Jul 25, 2014 3:17 am

Geez, I forgot that the insurance for a bus would have gone the same way it did with my Dual wheeled welding trucks...thru the roof! I only paid for PL & PD last I had a bus and it was cheap as a car back then. My RV was around $430 and I thought that high considering we'd only use it a couple times a year. Seems like I won't be doing the bus build ever again either!

I considered the RV less of a heat score way back though. I figured I would repaint the RV even a medium green but thought later it was best left the original tan as a grey man's camo instead. I miss the sturdy roof rack as it doubled as a heat deflector and I had a few roof parties on the bus in the past....won't be doing that on an RV!

We have various tarps of different sizes and bring many of them camping. Wife uses them as ground sheets and I use them for shade around and even over the RV to keep things cooler. This often looks less fancy than others but it keeps our campsite more private too. I don't drag large rugs as many bimbo's do so they have a carpeted sight...sheesh! :roll: this type of camping is more her bag and I bring the hog and bugger off lots instead. 8-)

I see the RV as a way of staying married and still not having to buy a cabin or such.
That multi-purpose role fits as it's:

1/BOV appeal
2/a way to have visitors and not trip over them
3/ another place to store and organize your duplicate junk :shock:
4/ a hunting shack
5/ a cheap motel if if need to do work out of town
6/ it didn't cost much to have all these advantages

I know that living in a city would make parking an RV harder and paying storage would become an added expense. With the problems occurring from ethanol gas separating over even a few months, one wouldn't want to leave fuel in an RV for long either so I'd suggest folks stick to finding diesels as a get around to this problem. Diesel keeps for 5 years and therefore allows preppers to properly prep still. Other issues C5 mention are things such as brake rotors rust up even over a year without being used as a means of keeping them polished. Letting any vehicle sit for a few years is bad as condensation occurs on everything metal, inside your motor and outside. Things we have to do....sigh! :(
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cernunnos5
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Re: The Mobile Home as your BOV

Postby cernunnos5 » Fri Jul 25, 2014 4:17 am

Its also seals drying out. Just try moving it without power steering or seized breaks or rusted break lines. BC makes it far easier to do the conversion. You need 5 of 7 things in it. I don't remember what they all were. A bed. A sink. A heater, a fridge, etcetera. I built them all into the bus for the inspection so it was considered a motorhome... then promptly ripped it all out afterwards to go with simpler systems that are more resilient. The insurance then became cheap. Cheaper then a car because they don't expect it to be used for commuting.

You called it right on the RV though. There is a saying," Women and cats Rule the world...and men and dogs should just get used to it". There are exceptions to the rule that prove the rule but.... Its close to impossible to survive in the middle of BF nowhere without a woman backing your play...and that requires flexibility. ( Don't worry. I will biatch slap our betters on the board later...with loving admiration.. and tell them to butch the F up...when it comes to toiletries. Wait till we talk about peeing in a bottle). A friend on a farm just went through a divorce and both me and Mrs C5 realised with horror that he could not survive here unless he quickly got his mojo back and attracted another babe. Its a death sentence in the outer worlds.

I remember a humorous banter between Joe Rogan and Michael Rupert. " The survival of the human race rests solely on hippy chicks. Without them, its just a bunch of agro dudes hanging out in the woods together...and that's not worth surviving".
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endangeredspecies
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Re: The Mobile Home as your BOV

Postby endangeredspecies » Fri Jul 25, 2014 4:35 am

this is my next project , rv look perfect for me ....
i found very interesting cernunnos comment because i know these vehicule are not adapted to winter
im cruious to know more of ur experience cernunnos .
is it possible to be selfsuffient whit some solar panel for an eletectric fridge the only thing i dont like from rv is all rely on propane ...
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Re: The Mobile Home as your BOV

Postby cernunnos5 » Fri Jul 25, 2014 9:59 pm

I've known one person that did. Very expensive. Roof full of panels for a small specialised fridge. Not the cheap panels from Canadian Tire. During the cold part of the year, I just put the stuff that needed refrigeration on the floor...and hoped it didn't freeze. I only got to eat cheese or milk or mayonnaise for half the year. A large amount of things we put in our fridge don't need to be in there like eggs and many vegies
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Knuckle
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Re: The Mobile Home as your BOV

Postby Knuckle » Fri Jul 25, 2014 11:51 pm

In the winter, we often make ice boxes with the snow at trappers shacks and cabins(this is so if animals smell the food, they don't wreck your shack getting to it.. We use a square of plywood for the lid. Just add some water to formed snow....too easy!

I bought solar cells and am going to make my own panels. I got 300 cells for $300 and free shipping. Should make 8 panels. I was going to just use heavy glass I already have from old windows with a good backing. I'd be using lexan though if I was doing the bus route. Be neat to design a roof rack that tilts so you could store them on the underside when traveling, and stand it up when stationary. I know I could rig it but fastening it to the RV might be tricky. A bus is heavy duty in comparison, hmmm, Now look what you started! :ugeek:
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Re: The Mobile Home as your BOV

Postby cernunnos5 » Sat Jul 26, 2014 12:51 am

Picked our sour cherries today followed by our tiny two bushes of blue berries and moved on to Saskatoon's. Got me thinking about telling you all about my first day going full nomad.

My first rolling home was simple to the max. A simple window van. A single bed. Fully curtained so it seemed like living in a tent. Storage under the bed. a wood box as a table to cook on with a wisperlight stove. I basically set myself adrift on a permanent camping trip. Good buy rent. Good buy room mates. I don't know when it hit me that it was also, Good buy society. I had just left the matrix. As I spent my first evening parking in public, the reality began to hit me like a wallop. The survival reality questions set in fast. OMG. What the hell did I just do? Where will I get water. Where can I take a sh!t? How will I wash? Where will I get rid of my garbage? Its the west coast but can I handle the winter? Where will I be safe? WHERE WILL I GET MAIL? How can I renew my insurance? Heck, even my ID and Drivers Licence. Is it even valid anymore because of the address. I don't have an address any more... and then it really set in. I AM ILLEGAL simply by being. Sleeping in this van means I am breaking the law. That was one wake up call. Do you notice how all of those questions I asked are the basic survival questions of prepping. What happens when society stops...and we have to suddenly figure this sh!t out on our own, independent of a functioning system. I thought I had some survival training before...But this was like going off to Survivalist University. I had a lot to learn. I was frightened and I was alone and the reality set in. It was like I had just gone through a break up or divorce. I'm sure you all know what that feeling is like. Only this time it was a divorce from most of the privileges and safety of society. Oh why didn't I just take the blue pill?

More on this subject later
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Knuckle
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Re: The Mobile Home as your BOV

Postby Knuckle » Sat Jul 26, 2014 2:10 am

A true junkie would ask something like "what if I take both the red and blue pill together" , "Will I have a foot in each world"? :lol:

I can't say that I faced it that way. I hid in a tent at the edge of a park and camped in the bushes for about 6 weeks once. I hid my bike with a green tarp and ate cold canned food alot because I thought a fire would give me away. I was saving money for a down payment on rent and utilities and such and never knew anybody back then to go in halves with. I would cruise around the campsites every evening on foot and talk with folks but never saying where my site was. I felt often like a low life bum half the time and the other half like I was beating the system by saving a nickel at every turn. I'd often get by on a can of creamed corn and a couple pieces of bread a day.

When I first bought a bus, the seller had collected an RV toilet, fridge,stove tanks, etc, already and that is as far as he got. Half the seats were ripped out and all this crap was piled inside. I thought it was a gold mine and did a straight trade for a 73 Satellite I bought for $500 a year before. I took alot of ribbing at first because it didn't even run and I had to tow it to my first spot. The dude had the firing order mixed up on the plugs is all that was wrong in the end. I never let the ribbing get me down as I figured I already knew tougher times than most of them and this was heaven in comparison to shivering in a tent in the wet cold rain. I think those I partied with often thought of me as poor yet I think I owned more than most of them back then. City bikers always tagged me as a country hillbilly and I didn't mind a bit cause they still paid me to fix their crap.

I left the isle straight down the middle in my first floor plan to allow up to 3 bikes to be stored inside for a road trip in bad weather. This proved to be a waste of space as I learned later. The Ford's walls were not insulated so I learned the hard way that was not the way to go as I was insulating the whole winter in stages. I had it all figured out by summer. :oops:
In the 2nd bus I built the isle off to one side. This allowed a better kitchen nook(converted to a double bed)with cupboards along the opposing side. It also allowed a decent sized washroom with built in shower that you could sit on the toilet and do both if you wanted at the same time :o ;) . (did I mention the dual purpose thing yet?). :roll: Then I had the master bedroom at the back with a queen size bed(with bus suspension if we bounced too much). If you design a bus,offset isle is the way to go! I put an insulated wall with a sliding insulated door at the front behind the drivers seat so as not to lose heat thru all the front windows and door. This becomes a porch area and a place for the dog to park to keep him from being underfoot in cramped quarters.

The inside of both buses was nicer than the outside, so folks were often pleasantly surprised when they first entered. I did everything in bright colors in the 2nd bus, white and tan with oak trim. I chose a dark blue RV fabric for with grey specked design for cushions and sewed them with grey cord edging. It's funny how I used to wait for their comments as I often never clued them in otherwise. In this way one gets to see the approval even if they don't say it! Keeping it bright keeps the spirits higher too!
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