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Water in B.O.B.'s

(Wilderness/Urban Survival), (BOB/BOL/INCH/ETC), (Shelters)
CSG
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Re: Water in B.O.B.'s

Postby CSG » Tue Apr 21, 2015 9:37 pm

For me this is a tough subject, I am a firm believer of having 1.5 litres of water in my BOB and 2 other water purifying options.

the tough part for me is that unless you train to carry a 20-50 lb backpack it doesnt matter what you have in it as you will not be carrying it far. I went on a hike with my BOB (25 lbs at the time) up a mountain 10-30% grades for 2 hours up. I train all the time on flat grounds but this was an experiance and a half. by the time I got to the top I wanted to get rid of as much stuff in my bag as possible. I was sweating, my legs were shaking, I was tired all I wanted to do was drop everything.

just goes to show you that its not just having the bag its knowing how to use it.

That being said Water is the second most important thing you need in a survival situation (shelter from elements being first). I would rather carry 6 liters of water and skip my shovel, Binocs, Rope etc.. then be without water.
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CSG

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Jimbo Jones
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Re: Water in B.O.B.'s

Postby Jimbo Jones » Wed Feb 14, 2018 1:25 am

I pack 3 bottles of water in my BOB 500 ml each along with a rolled up bladder from a Camel back with drinking hose. along with 2 water purification methods along with a boil method. I live in the south half of BC may not be a true desert but the ability to have high 30 c means its close and water IS a priority. My walk out bag in addition to my BOB contains water climate controlled clothing and some snack food if the veh is staying and i am walking out
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scrounger
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Re: Water in B.O.B.'s

Postby scrounger » Wed Feb 14, 2018 10:59 pm

Jimbo,

Look at throwing one of these in your vehicle. Great for turning on outdoor taps you find at malls etc.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/HDX-4-Way-S ... /204284856
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Wayne
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Re: Water in B.O.B.'s

Postby Wayne » Thu Feb 15, 2018 3:43 pm

JackDee wrote: ...My second favourite is tictac candy by eating just one candy at a time, let it kind of melt (tic tac is quite hard so it'll last long) and make the minty feeling on your mouth. If your mouth produce the saliva then just swallow it. So its like I drink my own saliva. A chewing gum might also do the trick but tictac lasts longer.


When your body needs water it does. However, a person often 'thinks' that they're thirsty and would drink water unnecessarily. If water is in short supply, JackDee's trick is a good one. Personally, I pick-up a small stone and suck on it. In-fact, I've collected 'sucking stones' from various locations where I've taught survival courses and have a bit of a collection... Ok, I know that sounds a little weird, but it's true...

People often make the same mistake with food. Remember the rule of 3's. You can live:

•3 minutes without AIR.
•3 hours without SHELTER.
•3 days without WATER.
•3 weeks without FOOD.
•3 months without HOPE.

Lack of energy (food) can however effect performance, so I recommend that (in a survival situation) you refrain from eating for the first 24 hours. If you have lots of food, wait. Because you have food and water doesn't mean that the best use of it is to eat and drink if you feel hungry or thirsty.

The most important thing to control in a survival situation is yourself. Controlling one's mental outlook is huge. Creating a set of rules for your actions is critical. The 'sucking stone' is a reminder that you have a plan in-place to maximize the resources you have.
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Jimbo Jones
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Re: Water in B.O.B.'s

Postby Jimbo Jones » Tue Feb 20, 2018 4:03 pm

scrounger wrote:Jimbo,

Look at throwing one of these in your vehicle. Great for turning on outdoor taps you find at malls etc.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/HDX-4-Way-S ... /204284856


thanks got to go to the big city today. will visit my niece who works there
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Clarence
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Re: Water in B.O.B.'s

Postby Clarence » Wed Feb 21, 2018 3:26 am

Wayne wrote:
JackDee wrote: ...My second favourite is tictac candy by eating just one candy at a time, let it kind of melt (tic tac is quite hard so it'll last long) and make the minty feeling on your mouth. If your mouth produce the saliva then just swallow it. So its like I drink my own saliva. A chewing gum might also do the trick but tictac lasts longer.
...

....The most important thing to control in a survival situation is yourself. Controlling one's mental outlook is huge. Creating a set of rules for your actions is critical. The 'sucking stone' is a reminder that you have a plan in-place to maximize the resources you have.


Wayne; Agree 10000% about the need to focus on the mind. Appraise the situation, human or weather threats, shelter, source for more water and food.... no one is starving that first day. Have to watch water so you don’t get dehydration headaches. You have experience with dry climes and other forms of survival, so how did you prevent them from occuring?

I think sucking stones is less weird then some people I have seen who collect spoons or brake parts for old farm carriages!
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Wayne
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Re: Water in B.O.B.'s

Postby Wayne » Wed Feb 21, 2018 1:19 pm

Clarence wrote: ...You have experience with dry climes and other forms of survival, so how did you prevent them from occuring?


There is a relationship between food input and the amount of water required. If you eat, you require additional water for the digestion process. Regardless of the amount of food on-hand, the amount you eat depends upon the amount of water available. In a low-water situation, you are better not to eat at all or severely limit your consumption (regardless of the amount of food available).

The exception to this rule is vegetables/fruits that contain high-water content; these include: Cantaloupe, Baby Carrots, Oranges, Grapefruit, Broccoli, Strawberries, Spinach, Watermelon, Cauliflower, Green Peppers, Tomatoes, Radishes, Celery, Lettuce, Cucumber. Each of these have water content in excess of 90%. So when it comes to this, you can eat your water.

As to water consumption, in a low-water available situation, this is what is taught in military survival schools (I'm not sure if this reflects today's line of thinking, but it's what I would adopt in an emergency):

1. If you're uninjured, refrain from water for 24 hours (this switches the preservation trigger and resets the body to slow down the loss).
2. Water is better stored within the body than outside it (but only to a degree).
3. The military use a minimum intake ratio of 1L/day (per 150 pound man) added to this is the effort scale. Obviously if you're humping a 100 pound pack on a mountainous jungle trail in severe heat, you require more water than if you are at rest in a boreal forest under shade.
4. Whatever you have available should be divided into 4 or 6 hour rations.
5. All of the ration should be consumed at once.
6. If available, a small fingernail quantity (1/16 tsp) of salt should be taken in the mouth first and left to dissolve before drinking (for each 8 ounces of water).
7. The water/salt relationship is huge. Lack of salt can cause fatigue, muscle cramps and disorientation.

Anyway Clarence, just a few points that come to mind... :-)
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Clarence
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Re: Water in B.O.B.'s

Postby Clarence » Wed Feb 21, 2018 8:00 pm

Wayne wrote:
Clarence wrote: ...You have experience with dry climes and other forms of survival, so how did you prevent them from occuring?


As to water consumption, in a low-water available situation, this is what is taught in military survival schools (I'm not sure if this reflects today's line of thinking, but it's what I would adopt in an emergency):

1. If you're uninjured, refrain from water for 24 hours (this switches the preservation trigger and resets the body to slow down the loss).
2. Water is better stored within the body than outside it (but only to a degree).
3. The military use a minimum intake ratio of 1L/day (per 150 pound man) added to this is the effort scale. Obviously if you're humping a 100 pound pack on a mountainous jungle trail in severe heat, you require more water than if you are at rest in a boreal forest under shade.
4. Whatever you have available should be divided into 4 or 6 hour rations.
5. All of the ration should be consumed at once.
6. If available, a small fingernail quantity (1/16 tsp) of salt should be taken in the mouth first and left to dissolve before drinking (for each 8 ounces of water).
7. The water/salt relationship is huge. Lack of salt can cause fatigue, muscle cramps and disorientation.

Anyway Clarence, just a few points that come to mind... :-)


Thanks Wayne. Will have to remember the salt trick.
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Jimbo Jones
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Re: Water in B.O.B.'s

Postby Jimbo Jones » Thu Feb 22, 2018 4:01 am

The Israeli's have done studies and after humping the hills in Afg.I know ill go through at least 1 l of water an hour in hot extreme climates . they hiked a company around the perimeter of their country during summer,with no heat related injuries.
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Wayne
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Re: Water in B.O.B.'s

Postby Wayne » Thu Feb 22, 2018 12:06 pm

Jimbo,

My son did 2 tours in Afghanistan as a close protection operator. What unit did you serve with and when? What was your MOSMOC? I did 7 years with the CF Reserve as a SAR Pilot, 400 Squadron in Downsview.
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