Climate Change effecting your garden plans?

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peppercorn
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Re: Climate Change effecting your garden plans?

Post by peppercorn » Sun May 27, 2018 4:30 am

I know too little about bees to comment on the subject other than less of them sounds bad.
Inadvertently my raised beds help greatly in water management, I thought to drain them down the center for water recovery, but what I have found is I quickly learned how much to water so there was no excess to run through in the first place.
I am expecting a much better potato harvest this year in spite of the drought. Just after this picture was taken I hilled them up.
potato1.jpg
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just for fun I did a bed up in leaves, grass, and pine cones..they took longer to take off but are growing now. Note that this bed is constructed of insulated garage door sections...you can get them free from the land fill...scrap metal yards or even from people replacing their garage doors.
potato 2.jpg
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14 to 17 inches is roughly the yearly rainfall range I can expect...all my gardening water is from rainfall. Storage is key.


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Protector
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Re: Climate Change effecting your garden plans?

Post by Protector » Sun May 27, 2018 7:53 am

farmgal wrote:Lets talk about Vanilla beans.. I am so glad that I have a good amount in storage.. I have a number of years worth of supply but still.. I would not be buying or using at this point in regards to the price point.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scot ... -1.4592165

A one-litre bottle of vanilla paste that cost about $30 rose to $80, then $125 and it's now hovering around $160, she said. That 500-per-cent jump was one of the reasons Harrison recently increased her prices for the first time since opening her shop five years ago.

The high cost of vanilla is being blamed on short supply. Last spring, cyclone Enawo tore through Madagascar, where about 80 per cent of the world's vanilla is grown.

"What producers and suppliers had said was, 'You know what, it was a bad crop. It should improve.' Well, it hasn't improved yet. I don't know if it will, but we haven't seen any decrease," Harrison said.


I have personal hopes that the price will come down and become reasonable again and that I will at that point stock up.. How about you> Do you have a couple years worth of beans stored and you can wait it out? or are you changing your use? Can you afford to take a 500 percent price hike? or have you moved to fake flavour?
We make our own vanilla extract with vodka. We usually have one new and old batch going. We no doubt need more beans too...

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farmgal
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Re: Climate Change effecting your garden plans?

Post by farmgal » Sun May 27, 2018 12:43 pm

Peppercorn, thanks for the bed overviews and loved the details on the soil and the rain fall.. so you have a third of the average rain fall on your land then I do on my area.. and I agree for sure.. rain water storage is key.

your first spud patch looks really nice.. can you do me a favor and keep a eye out for if they will produce seed balls at all in a raised bed.. its something that I am tracking.. so far the data appears to show that in ground makes more seed balls then raised beds of any kind do.. and I am not sure why.. I need more folks to report back to me on this subject to get a better number spread.

Interesting on the second box.. I would have gone with squash in that mix myself.. come back at the end and tell me what the yield difference is.. is it the same kind of potato so that you are comparing the same kind or are they different?
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peppercorn
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Re: Climate Change effecting your garden plans?

Post by peppercorn » Mon May 28, 2018 2:23 am

Yes same type. Yukon gold and German butter ball. Yes I had some seed balls last year( cant remember from what ones though, Had 5 types planted last year, only 3 this year). I will snap a picture of them this year.
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farmgal
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Re: Climate Change effecting your garden plans?

Post by farmgal » Mon May 28, 2018 12:36 pm

I have had seed balls on the german butter ball..
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peppercorn
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Re: Climate Change effecting your garden plans?

Post by peppercorn » Thu May 31, 2018 4:18 am

Finally, the first rain. Misty and light rain all day...added up to almost 1/2 inch.
Give a man a gun, and he can rob a bank. Give a man a bank, and he can rob the world.

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Re: Climate Change effecting your garden plans?

Post by farmgal » Sun Jun 03, 2018 12:34 pm

34156944_1538458979614142_6956454067136626688_n.jpg
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Working on another food or medical hedge row. Another layer going in.

This row's bones are three saskatoon tree's, two blue berry bushes, two clove current bushes, one smoke tree and two black chokeberry bushes, the next layer that is already in are three comfrey plants, then in the next layer, we have spearmint and bee-balm and milk weed and a few golden rods so far..

The cut from our land, log edging, with 4 to 6 six inch prepared half rotted already old hay that will surpress anything growing. today we will haul a mix of dirt and compost and cover it and fill up the back planting, when done.. it will be a new food-medical-bee pollinator friendly hedge row.
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farmgal
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Re: Climate Change effecting your garden plans?

Post by farmgal » Thu Jun 07, 2018 4:01 pm

Well, got the new food hedge row soil in and the first main row planted, still need to do the side yet..

Also found out that I will need to do a lot of pruning and cleaning up on my plum bushes as they are currently effected with a fungal issue that is called plum pocket.. total plum crop failure this year.. one fruit done.. Never count your fruits before they are harvested!

A few of my older bean types have had VERY poor germination rates, while others are up at 90 plus percent, replanting will be required today. My Early started peppers and tomato plants are thriving and are already setting fruit.

I don't think I have ever had tomato's setting fruit before the elderberry bushes have bloomed before.. such a odd garden year so far!
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peppercorn
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Re: Climate Change effecting your garden plans?

Post by peppercorn » Sat Jun 09, 2018 6:28 am

June 9th total rainfall so far at .5 inch. This is becoming bad. When my hop plants don't get spring rains they start to suffer. I can roughly tell when its been a below average rainfall year by how far along my hop plants have climbed. We have had lots of very hot days as well.
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farmgal
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Re: Climate Change effecting your garden plans?

Post by farmgal » Sat Jun 09, 2018 12:30 pm

Stay safe today, I see there is a major storm warning coming your way.. Hail, and possible twister maybe as you are in the edge of it, you will get some rain instead.

.5 inch is indeed bad.. if the hop plant with its deep roots is having trouble then that dryness in the soil goes way down..
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