Climate Change effecting your garden plans?

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farmgal
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Re: Climate Change effecting your garden plans?

Post by farmgal »

I know Kootenay Kid.. I was surprised to see in the news that there was snow in July and pretty far down from what I could understand.. it seems like you do indeed have a cooler summer.

I have never hit that kind of temp before either and I would be just fine to never again but I expect I will see higher over the next twenty or thirty years, I am very torn, I find going from AC to working on the outside very hard (I have trouble moving from the AC in a vehicle to outside heat) so I normally think its better to just use the basement and fans.. but because of the add up effect of so many days of heat.. I might have to re-think it and consider getting something that can do a bedroom, even if its just so we can cool off in the evening and get sleep.

As of today, 48 have died in Quebec that have been ruled from the heat wave.. all without AC, 60 percent single men, and a lot of them in apartments and while they say they had underlining health or mental issues..


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peppercorn
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Re: Climate Change effecting your garden plans?

Post by peppercorn »

farmgal wrote:with the humidity, which at times seemed like it was pressing on you, yesterday 44 and our new record on the past weekend 47.. I agree.. I do not function well at these temps, no ac, effecting sleep, effecting whole body after so many days straight o it, when your night time LOW is 26 with 76 percent humidity in your house, sleep is hard to come by despite basement an fans ec

The gardens have held ok for it but today is cooler and if they are right that we have more coming, I am not as sure they will hold as well
Are you saying you hit 47 degrees? I thought you miss typed and ment 37 maybe.
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farmgal
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Re: Climate Change effecting your garden plans?

Post by farmgal »

https://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-ne ... dex-record

From noon to 3 p.m. on July 1, the humidex stood at 47, the stickiest humidex Ottawa has experienced since we started recording the index back in 1953. Gatineau reached 48 briefly that day.

We haven’t set heat records for any individual day. But the length of this hot spell — forecast to last seven days from last Friday through Thursday — is close to record-setting.

“There was only one other occasion when there were seven days or more of temperatures above 32,” said David Phillips, senior climatologist for Environment Canada. That was in 1944, with eight straight days. (The records go back to 1938.)

It was insane heat combined with Humidity.. Aweful! It was like being in a sauna and even the night time did not cool off, I started getting up before 5 am so that could do chores in a mear 22 degree's but per our farm weather unit, it was 26 and with humidex it was over 30 by 6 am..
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farmgal
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Re: Climate Change effecting your garden plans?

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https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal ... -1.4736509

So my farm is split equal in distance between Ottawa and montreal.. you can reach both downtown within an hours drive (depending on traffic flow and time of day) The deaths from the heat wave seem centered on Montreal.

At least 54 people have died in the past six days, apparent victims of a heat wave that consumed southern Quebec and saw temperatures in the low to mid 30s for nearly a week.

According to the province's Health Ministry, 28 of those deaths were in Montreal, 10 more than were reported Thursday.

The breakdown of deaths per region is as follows:
Mauricie: 7
Montreal: 28
Laval: 1
Lanaudière: 1
Laurentides: 1
Montérégie: 6
Estrie: 9
In a news release, the ministry said an increase in the death toll was expected because of the toll the heat takes on the body, especially for the elderly and those with chronic diseases, and because of the heat accumulation inside buildings.
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sixoklok
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Re: Climate Change effecting your garden plans?

Post by sixoklok »

Hi, new member from Southern Manitoba. We have a rural homestead with 2 ponds and new this year, a 2nd garden mostly for perennials. Because we believe our local weather will keep getting dryer and warmer (widely variable in winter), we've invested in irrigation for both gardens. Several years ago I was asked by an oat milling company if I wanted my pond (the one they see from the road) filled in with oat hulls. They want to get rid of them, but I told him the water (and wildlife it brings) was far more important than gaining an acre of cultivated land.

I'm also bending the zone rules a bit (4a) by starting some plants about 2 weeks earlier in the year than I would have 5-10 years ago. I've invested in greenhouse equipment to extend the season even further at both ends. Perhaps citrus fruits in a few years?? Because the unpredictablility of our weather will increase, with winter storms coming more often, I've also restored the 100 yr old chimney with a SS liner, to resume heating with wood after a 30 yr switch to electric furnace.

Also, -and this is due to other factors than simply climate change- I've invested in electrical co-generation equipment to offset energy cost and because I believe power outages will become more common with downed lines.

Full disclosure: not climate related, but malicious EMP plays a factor too.
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farmgal
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Re: Climate Change effecting your garden plans?

Post by farmgal »

Welcome Sixokluk

Nice to have your on the board, sounds like you have a nice set up on your homestead.. If you don't mind me asking, tell me more about your perennial garden and what you are planning on planting in there.. are you aiming for eating perennials like Good Kind Henry and Skirret or are you aiming more for small fruit gardening or are you talking about English style food hedge gardens or right up into a full permaculture type food perennial garden.

I play with all the above and I find each one responds different depending on the weather of the year, it gives me backups on backups as they say :)

I am so glad that you can do that kind of irrigation for the gardens. I hear ya on bending the zone rules, even basic hoop house row cover will make a difference on those two week early start and on the back end as well. Good for you on the chimney work!
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scrounger
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Re: Climate Change effecting your garden plans?

Post by scrounger »

Sixoklok,

I did a quick google on oat hulls (by products are something I find interesting). Many uses for them. Cattle feed supplement. bedding and burning as biomass to name a few. Welcome aboard btw.

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helicopilot
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Re: Climate Change effecting your garden plans?

Post by helicopilot »

Not sure about climate change or a combination of a lousy winter and use of chemicals, but I'm seeing noticeably fewer bees around this year. This may be the reason why my fruit trees are bare. This time last year, bees where on just about every flowers we had around the property, from dandelions and clover to tomato plants and rose bushes. While I couldn't walk 10 steps without seeing or hearing a bee, now I can go whole days working around the acreage without seeing one.

If this is new reality, this is going to hurt!
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farmgal
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Re: Climate Change effecting your garden plans?

Post by farmgal »

The Bee's are a subject that is near and dear to me, I do a lot for them and I was SHOCKED at how poor my spring was, still compared to others I have talked to, I am doing well. I currently have seven native bee's and the populations are growing well in this season. Its always startling to me how short of a distance that many of the native bee's will travel.. they have much! shorter travel area then the honeybee does.

This can be a good thing as if you set it up right, they will stay in your own land and not go off to far and get hit with treated seed or spray drift in the same way.

Having said that I am down about 70 percent from my normal this spring. I have added in more food plants for them in each season. I have built more native bee hotels in different area's. I have made sure each section of the garden area's have bee water stations. I have also ordered in more native bee coon's to increase my population.

I do not keep honey bee's instead I use Mason bee's for spring cropping, outstanding pollination rates without the same kind of upkeep.. I have also ordered leaf cutters once and I do have both at this time.. I would like to bring in new genes into the Mason Bee population and with the way I have done the new food hedge rows, I can do a whole new set up in that area.. its as dead center to my land, its the best area that I am going to have to be the bee center of the farm.

http://www.masonbeecentral.com/
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farmgal
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Re: Climate Change effecting your garden plans?

Post by farmgal »

Ps, while we do want the bubble bee for the right buzz for the tomato's, there is a native fly that do the work as well, I am still hunting down a source on them but I intend to add them to the farm as a back up to the bumbles for that crop.

The best population on the farm is without a doubt the squash bee's and that is because I do work hard to leave their overwinter nesting area alone and lightly covered with bedding down.. It means for a messy look late fall and early spring but it keeps that in ground population going strong.
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