Surviving an active shooter

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Wayne
Canada
Posts: 698
Joined: Wed Dec 07, 2016 9:24 pm
Location: Nova Scotia

Re: Surviving an active shooter

Post by Wayne » Mon Jan 07, 2019 9:08 am

helicopilot wrote: ...It would be a considerable 180 to not only reverse the gun control movement, but get it to a point where CCW is legal.
The long gun registry was reversed. This was a 180 degree change of direction to what was previously taken. Like I mentioned, it has swung in both directions over time. Don't be surprised if it changes direction again.
helicopilot wrote: Unlike our counterparts to the south, we also don’t have the legislation in place to protect someone defending themselves. What good would a CCW law be if it guarantees you 20 years in prison for manslaughter or assault with a deadly weapon?
I believe that Section 25 of the Criminal Code outlines the use of force by law enforcement. Personal defence (Section 34) and defence of property (Section 35) offer public protections. The reasonableness of the response is the standard for assessment.


None you improvise, one (or more) is luxury.

User avatar
Wayne
Canada
Posts: 698
Joined: Wed Dec 07, 2016 9:24 pm
Location: Nova Scotia

Re: Surviving an active shooter

Post by Wayne » Mon Jan 07, 2019 9:35 am

Odin Gray wrote: According to international law, police officers are considered civilians so should abide by the same laws as anybody else.
This isn't true in Canada. Police are afforded protections under the Criminal Code that the public don't have (unless they're aiding police). Provincial statutes have specific sections where they're allowed to break the law in the performance of their duties (speeding for example).
Odin Gray wrote: Competence within the police department? Six months at depot (or police acacademy) to train a recruit? Even a school teacher is required to have a five year degree to practice their trade. Two years training to be a forestry technician. Six months and some professional development courses only instills arrogance aka "Esprit de Corps".
Most police officers on the job that I know have a university degree. Many have specialties in criminology, sociology or law. Others have a minimum of a two year college course in police science. The prerequisites vary between departments, but the selection process can be difficult.

After you're selected, you have one or two courses you must attend. Depot for the RCMP and the Ontario Police College (or other provincial counterpart) and private institutions such as the Ontario Provincial Police College. You are then assigned to a Division or Detachment. Over the next year you're on probation and assigned to a training officer.

Like in any job, no one's perfect. You eventually get your feet under you and move forward. Like any group of people, you have some better than others and there's the occasional bad one. The force has a tendency to weed out the bad ones or put them in meaningless positions.
Odin Gray wrote: Most of the cops that I know can't shoot worth a darn. Outside of major metropolitan areas, if we wait for a tactical team to arrive in the active shooter scenario, response time would probably be measured in hours.
Police have to qualify periodically. This varies from ongoing qualifications in the tactical team to monthly or yearly sessions (depending on the Department and assignment). Positions like being an air marshal require a higher level of skill-set than a patrol officer for example. I agree that most police officers could use more practice.
None you improvise, one (or more) is luxury.

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