Flooding (mitigation + safety tips)

General Preparedness Discussions
Post Reply
User avatar
itsadisaster
United States of America
Posts: 45
Joined: Sat Jan 22, 2011 5:27 am
Location: Texas, USA
Contact:

Flooding (mitigation + safety tips)

Post by itsadisaster » Sat Mar 12, 2011 5:13 am

Please add any other safety tips, links and/or experiences that can help others! Thx, itsa

Floods are the most common natural disaster. Everyone is at risk from floods and flash floods, even in areas that seem harmless in dry weather. And many natural disasters like hurricanes, thunderstorms, and melting snow cause flooding. Living near a dam or levee can also increase your flood risk.

Flood damage is the second most common disaster-related expense of insured losses reported worldwide. According to FEMA, everyone lives in a flood zone - it’s just a question of whether you live in a low, moderate or high risk area.

There are some things you can do to mitigate (or lessen) the impact disasters have on people, property, communities and the economy. Mitigation is also about reducing or eliminating risks before disasters strike and involves planning, commitment, preparation and communication between local, state and federal government officials, businesses and the general public.

Remember... the more you prepare BEFORE disaster strikes, the better off you and your loved ones will be financially, emotionally and physically.


BEFORE A FLOOD (OR HEAVY RAIN):

Get flood insurance – Regular insurance companies will cover some claims due to water damage like a broken water main or a washing machine that goes berserk. However, standard home insurance policies DO NOT generally cover flood (or mud) damage caused by natural events or disasters!

The U.S. offers a National Flood Insurance Program available in most communities and there is a waiting period for coverage. Both homeowners and renters can get flood insurance as long as your community participates in the NFIP. Talk to your insurance agent or call NFIP at 1-888-379-9531 or visit http://www.floodsmart.gov

Did you know...

... you can buy federal flood insurance through most major insurance companies and licensed agents?!

... you do not have to own a home to have flood insurance as long as your community participates in the NFIP?!

... NFIP offers coverage even in flood-prone areas and offers basement and below ground level coverage?!

Currently Canadians do not have a national flood program, however certain parts of Canada offer limited flood-damage coverage but it must be purchased year-round and rates are relatively high. Visit http://www.ibc.ca

Get weather radios - NOAA Weather Radio or Environment Canada Weatheradio with battery backup and tone-alert feature can alert you when Watches or Warnings have been issued.

Move valuables to higher ground - If your home or business is prone to flooding, you should move valuables and appliances out of the basement or ground level floors.

Elevate breakers, fuse box and meters
- Consider phoning a professional to elevate the main breaker or fuse box and utility meters above the anticipated flood level so flood waters won’t damage your utilities. Also consider putting heating, ventilation and air conditioning units in the upper story or attic to protect from flooding.

Protect your property - Build barriers and landscape around homes or buildings to stop or reduce floodwaters and mud from entering. Also consider sealing basement walls with waterproofing compounds and installing "check valves" in sewer traps to prevent flood water from backing up into drains.

Learn the buzzwords - Learn the terms / words used with floods...
Flood watch - flooding is possible
Flash flood watch - flash flooding is possible so move to higher ground if in a low-lying area
Flood warning - flooding is occurring or will occur soon so listen to radio or TV for updates or evacuation alerts
Flash flood warning - flash flood is occurring so seek higher ground on foot immediately
Urban and Small Stream Advisory - flooding of small streams, streets and low-lying areas is occurring

Learn risks - Ask you local emergency management office if your property is a flood-prone or high-risk area and what you can do to reduce risks to your property and home. Find out what official flood warning signals are and what to do when you hear them. Ask if there are dams or levees nearby and if they could be hazards.

Make a plan - Develop a Family Emergency Plan (e.g. map out evacuation routes, decide where you and your family will meet if separated, teach family members how to shut off main utility switches, discuss what to do with pets and critters, etc). And assemble Disaster Supplies Kits or BOB in case you have to bail.

Learn to shut off - Know where and how to shut off electricity, gas and water at main switches and valves -- and ask local utilities for instructions.

Put it on film/chip/drive - Either videotape or take pictures of home and personal belongings and store them in a safe place with important papers.


DURING A FLOOD (OR HEAVY RAIN):

Be aware - Listen to local news and watch for flash floods especially if near streams, drainage channels, and areas known to flood. Be prepared to fill and place sandbags in areas as instructed to help combat rising waters.

Get to higher ground - If in a low-lying area, move to higher ground.

Prepare to evacuate – and IF time also…
- Secure home and move important items to upper floors.
- Turn off utilities at main switches or valves if instructed by authorities and DO NOT touch electrical equipment if you are wet or standing in water!
- Fill up your car with fuel.

Obey warnings - If road signs, barricades, or cones are placed in areas – DO NOT drive around them! Find another way or you may get fined.

Things to avoid:
moving water - 6 inches (15 cm) of moving water can knock you off your feet and 2 ft (0.6 m) can float a car
flooding car - if flood waters rise around your car, get out and move to higher ground if you can do it safely
bad weather - leave early enough so you’re not trapped
flooded areas - roadways and bridges may be washed-out
downed power lines - extremely dangerous in floods!!


AFTER A FLOOD (OR HEAVY RAIN):

Things to avoid:
flood waters - avoid since they may be contaminated by oil, gasoline or raw sewage or may be electrically charged from underground or downed power lines - local authorities will say when it’s okay to return
moving water - 6 inches (15 cm) can knock you off your feet and 2 ft (0.6 m) can float a car
flooded areas - roadways and bridges may be washed-out
downed power lines - extremely dangerous and report them to the power company

Obey warnings - If road signs, barricades, or cones are placed in areas - OBEY THEM! Most areas fine people who ignore posted warnings. DO NOT drive around barricades… find another way to get there! (As fyi, Arizona has a “stupid motorist law” meaning if someone crosses a barrier and gets stuck, they pay for the entire cost of the rescue. Hopefully more states will follow suit.)

Strange critters - Watch out for snakes and other wildlife in areas that were flooded. Don’t try to care for a wounded critter since it may try to attack you... call your local animal control office or animal shelter.

Flooded food - Throw away food that has come into contact with flood waters since eating it can make you sick.

Drinking water - Officials will advise when water is safe to drink. If you have a well that gets contaminated, find another source or boil water.

Wash your hands - Wash hands often with clean water and soap since flood waters are dirty and full of germs!

Use bleach – The best thing to use for cleaning up flooded areas is household bleach since it helps kill germs.

Sandbags - If any sandbags come into contact with floodwaters, wear rubber gloves when removing them and follow officials’ instructions on where to discard them since they’re most likely contaminated.

Listen - Continue listening to radio or TV for updates on weather and tips on getting assistance for housing, clothing, food, etc.

Insurance - If your home suffers any damage, contact your insurance agent and keep all receipts for clean-up and repairs.

Mold - Consider asking a restoration professional to inspect your house for mold. Also check out http://www.epa.gov/mold

Some additional things to check and do...
- Check electrical system (watch for sparks, broken wires or the smell of hot insulation)
- Check appliances after turning off electricity at main fuse and, if wet, unplug and let them dry out. Call a professional to check them before using.
- Check water and sewage system and, if pipes are damaged, turn off main water valve.
- Throw out food, makeup and medicines that may have been exposed to flood waters and check refrigerated foods to see if they are spoiled. If frozen foods have ice crystals in them then okay to refreeze.
- Throw out moldy items that are porous (like rotten wood, carpet padding, furniture, etc.) if they’re too difficult to clean and remove mold. Remove standing water and scrub moldy surfaces with non-ammonia soap or detergent, or a commercial cleaner, rinse with clean water and dry completely. Then use a mixture of 1 part bleach to 10 parts clean water to wipe down surfaces or items, rinse and dry.
- Secure valuable items or move them to another location, if possible


Above extracted from IT'S A DISASTER! book (proceeds benefit APN and IPN)


Additional resources (my apologies for not having any international sites so please add your various countries' links too) ...

EPA’s Safewater site (emergency disinfecting data, tips for well & septic owners, etc)
http://www.epa.gov/safewater/emergency/index.html

Iowa Conservation and Preservation Consortium's "Flood Recovery Booklet" (includes tips on how to dry materials like artwork, books, photographs, CD/DVDs, etc) http://www.neilsa.org

The Institute for Business & Home Safety (tips on basements, fuel tanks, etc) http://www.disastersafety.org

National Flood Insurance Program (the maps feature is under "Flooding & Flood Risk" menu) http://www.floodsmart.gov

National Landslide Information Center Learning & Education page (see menu on left side)
http://landslides.usgs.gov/learning/


Some other related topics on IPN forum include Landslides & Mudflows and Winter Storms


Be Aware... Be Prepared... and Have a Plan!

Clarence
Canada
Posts: 966
Joined: Sun Sep 10, 2017 2:13 am
Location: Ottawa area, Ontario
Contact:

Re: Flooding (mitigation + safety tips)

Post by Clarence » Wed May 01, 2019 8:11 pm

some great tips in here for those under flood advisory or for the future

itsadisaster wrote:
Sat Mar 12, 2011 5:13 am
Please add any other safety tips, links and/or experiences that can help others! Thx, itsa

Floods are the most common natural disaster. Everyone is at risk from floods and flash floods, even in areas that seem harmless in dry weather. And many natural disasters like hurricanes, thunderstorms, and melting snow cause flooding. Living near a dam or levee can also increase your flood risk.

Flood damage is the second most common disaster-related expense of insured losses reported worldwide. According to FEMA, everyone lives in a flood zone - it’s just a question of whether you live in a low, moderate or high risk area.

There are some things you can do to mitigate (or lessen) the impact disasters have on people, property, communities and the economy. Mitigation is also about reducing or eliminating risks before disasters strike and involves planning, commitment, preparation and communication between local, state and federal government officials, businesses and the general public.

Remember... the more you prepare BEFORE disaster strikes, the better off you and your loved ones will be financially, emotionally and physically.


BEFORE A FLOOD (OR HEAVY RAIN):

Get flood insurance – Regular insurance companies will cover some claims due to water damage like a broken water main or a washing machine that goes berserk. However, standard home insurance policies DO NOT generally cover flood (or mud) damage caused by natural events or disasters!

The U.S. offers a National Flood Insurance Program available in most communities and there is a waiting period for coverage. Both homeowners and renters can get flood insurance as long as your community participates in the NFIP. Talk to your insurance agent or call NFIP at 1-888-379-9531 or visit http://www.floodsmart.gov

Did you know...

... you can buy federal flood insurance through most major insurance companies and licensed agents?!

... you do not have to own a home to have flood insurance as long as your community participates in the NFIP?!

... NFIP offers coverage even in flood-prone areas and offers basement and below ground level coverage?!

Currently Canadians do not have a national flood program, however certain parts of Canada offer limited flood-damage coverage but it must be purchased year-round and rates are relatively high. Visit http://www.ibc.ca

Get weather radios - NOAA Weather Radio or Environment Canada Weatheradio with battery backup and tone-alert feature can alert you when Watches or Warnings have been issued.

Move valuables to higher ground - If your home or business is prone to flooding, you should move valuables and appliances out of the basement or ground level floors.

Elevate breakers, fuse box and meters
- Consider phoning a professional to elevate the main breaker or fuse box and utility meters above the anticipated flood level so flood waters won’t damage your utilities. Also consider putting heating, ventilation and air conditioning units in the upper story or attic to protect from flooding.

Protect your property - Build barriers and landscape around homes or buildings to stop or reduce floodwaters and mud from entering. Also consider sealing basement walls with waterproofing compounds and installing "check valves" in sewer traps to prevent flood water from backing up into drains.

Learn the buzzwords - Learn the terms / words used with floods...
Flood watch - flooding is possible
Flash flood watch - flash flooding is possible so move to higher ground if in a low-lying area
Flood warning - flooding is occurring or will occur soon so listen to radio or TV for updates or evacuation alerts
Flash flood warning - flash flood is occurring so seek higher ground on foot immediately
Urban and Small Stream Advisory - flooding of small streams, streets and low-lying areas is occurring

Learn risks - Ask you local emergency management office if your property is a flood-prone or high-risk area and what you can do to reduce risks to your property and home. Find out what official flood warning signals are and what to do when you hear them. Ask if there are dams or levees nearby and if they could be hazards.

Make a plan - Develop a Family Emergency Plan (e.g. map out evacuation routes, decide where you and your family will meet if separated, teach family members how to shut off main utility switches, discuss what to do with pets and critters, etc). And assemble Disaster Supplies Kits or BOB in case you have to bail.

Learn to shut off - Know where and how to shut off electricity, gas and water at main switches and valves -- and ask local utilities for instructions.

Put it on film/chip/drive - Either videotape or take pictures of home and personal belongings and store them in a safe place with important papers.


DURING A FLOOD (OR HEAVY RAIN):

Be aware - Listen to local news and watch for flash floods especially if near streams, drainage channels, and areas known to flood. Be prepared to fill and place sandbags in areas as instructed to help combat rising waters.

Get to higher ground - If in a low-lying area, move to higher ground.

Prepare to evacuate – and IF time also…
- Secure home and move important items to upper floors.
- Turn off utilities at main switches or valves if instructed by authorities and DO NOT touch electrical equipment if you are wet or standing in water!
- Fill up your car with fuel.

Obey warnings - If road signs, barricades, or cones are placed in areas – DO NOT drive around them! Find another way or you may get fined.

Things to avoid:
moving water - 6 inches (15 cm) of moving water can knock you off your feet and 2 ft (0.6 m) can float a car
flooding car - if flood waters rise around your car, get out and move to higher ground if you can do it safely
bad weather - leave early enough so you’re not trapped
flooded areas - roadways and bridges may be washed-out
downed power lines - extremely dangerous in floods!!


AFTER A FLOOD (OR HEAVY RAIN):

Things to avoid:
flood waters - avoid since they may be contaminated by oil, gasoline or raw sewage or may be electrically charged from underground or downed power lines - local authorities will say when it’s okay to return
moving water - 6 inches (15 cm) can knock you off your feet and 2 ft (0.6 m) can float a car
flooded areas - roadways and bridges may be washed-out
downed power lines - extremely dangerous and report them to the power company

Obey warnings - If road signs, barricades, or cones are placed in areas - OBEY THEM! Most areas fine people who ignore posted warnings. DO NOT drive around barricades… find another way to get there! (As fyi, Arizona has a “stupid motorist law” meaning if someone crosses a barrier and gets stuck, they pay for the entire cost of the rescue. Hopefully more states will follow suit.)

Strange critters - Watch out for snakes and other wildlife in areas that were flooded. Don’t try to care for a wounded critter since it may try to attack you... call your local animal control office or animal shelter.

Flooded food - Throw away food that has come into contact with flood waters since eating it can make you sick.

Drinking water - Officials will advise when water is safe to drink. If you have a well that gets contaminated, find another source or boil water.

Wash your hands - Wash hands often with clean water and soap since flood waters are dirty and full of germs!

Use bleach – The best thing to use for cleaning up flooded areas is household bleach since it helps kill germs.

Sandbags - If any sandbags come into contact with floodwaters, wear rubber gloves when removing them and follow officials’ instructions on where to discard them since they’re most likely contaminated.

Listen - Continue listening to radio or TV for updates on weather and tips on getting assistance for housing, clothing, food, etc.

Insurance - If your home suffers any damage, contact your insurance agent and keep all receipts for clean-up and repairs.

Mold - Consider asking a restoration professional to inspect your house for mold. Also check out http://www.epa.gov/mold

Some additional things to check and do...
- Check electrical system (watch for sparks, broken wires or the smell of hot insulation)
- Check appliances after turning off electricity at main fuse and, if wet, unplug and let them dry out. Call a professional to check them before using.
- Check water and sewage system and, if pipes are damaged, turn off main water valve.
- Throw out food, makeup and medicines that may have been exposed to flood waters and check refrigerated foods to see if they are spoiled. If frozen foods have ice crystals in them then okay to refreeze.
- Throw out moldy items that are porous (like rotten wood, carpet padding, furniture, etc.) if they’re too difficult to clean and remove mold. Remove standing water and scrub moldy surfaces with non-ammonia soap or detergent, or a commercial cleaner, rinse with clean water and dry completely. Then use a mixture of 1 part bleach to 10 parts clean water to wipe down surfaces or items, rinse and dry.
- Secure valuable items or move them to another location, if possible


Above extracted from IT'S A DISASTER! book (proceeds benefit APN and IPN)


Additional resources (my apologies for not having any international sites so please add your various countries' links too) ...

EPA’s Safewater site (emergency disinfecting data, tips for well & septic owners, etc)
http://www.epa.gov/safewater/emergency/index.html

Iowa Conservation and Preservation Consortium's "Flood Recovery Booklet" (includes tips on how to dry materials like artwork, books, photographs, CD/DVDs, etc) http://www.neilsa.org

The Institute for Business & Home Safety (tips on basements, fuel tanks, etc) http://www.disastersafety.org

National Flood Insurance Program (the maps feature is under "Flooding & Flood Risk" menu) http://www.floodsmart.gov

National Landslide Information Center Learning & Education page (see menu on left side)
http://landslides.usgs.gov/learning/


Some other related topics on IPN forum include Landslides & Mudflows and Winter Storms

Clarence
Canada
Posts: 966
Joined: Sun Sep 10, 2017 2:13 am
Location: Ottawa area, Ontario
Contact:

Re: Flooding (mitigation + safety tips)

Post by Clarence » Fri Nov 15, 2019 9:23 pm

Seems odd to think of spring flooding now but I just came back from trip to montreal and from what I can see and remember form a lifetime of traveling along lake St. Louis and st Lawrence, I “think” the water levels are still high. If I am correct, this will likely mean more flooding.

As usual, all talk about what Really caused the spring floods along ottawa river and some surrounding lakes in ottawa and Gatineau area dropped off quickly this past spring. My guess is quebec was saved from greater flooding at sacrifice of ottawa but that’s just a hunch.

So for those who haven’t got their stuff together or just dodged the bullet last few years, I would look into how you will cope in 2020

If anyone has a link to official report on the cause for recent flooding, please post

For those who are new to this site and have property near water, start looking at your exposure

thecrownsown
Topic Leader
Canada
Posts: 838
Joined: Sun May 27, 2012 10:27 pm
Location: SW Ontario, ON

Re: Flooding (mitigation + safety tips)

Post by thecrownsown » Fri Nov 22, 2019 8:02 pm

That was an excellent post and read.

I may add a few more items:

-Review your properties landscaping to help water attenuation and that around your property so water can continue away from your residence or important structures.
-Get a check valve for your sanitary line. Often in flooding not onlyy storm but sanitary sewers back up and flood basements. Putting a check valve will keep city sewage from backing flowing into your home. And it should be checked periodically to make sure none of your flushables has inadvertently gotten stuck in the gate. (sometimes toilet paper, or whatever your kid flushes down the toilet can get stuck at the actual valve.) Not expensive to install, and can save so much.
-Ensure your sump pump is in good working order and operational. Know where it pumps to (not just to outside the house but well away or tied into the storm line.
-Having some small frog pumps or even a trash pump as a back up is a great idea. little 1/4hp pumps are less then $150 new (fraction used) and plug into a generator to provide emergency water removal with a garden hose if it comes to that.
https://www.internationalpreppersnetwork.net/viewtopic.php?f=57&t=7738

Clarence
Canada
Posts: 966
Joined: Sun Sep 10, 2017 2:13 am
Location: Ottawa area, Ontario
Contact:

Re: Flooding (mitigation + safety tips)

Post by Clarence » Sat Nov 23, 2019 4:06 pm

I have posted about the use of marine bilge pumps in other postings. Great item to pump water out of basement, transferring of water n a creek....to a container. I used to used it to suck up lake water into my boats fresh was
Tear tank ( yes treated with bleach)

Beauty of course is they are 12 volt, good quantity with bigger units, no complicated ( easily damaged) float arms of conventional basement pumps

The other thing that I just thought of is, you could put a few pumps into one basement pit. Stager them at different levels so if bottom level ever gets jammed up with debris, the one or two upper level pumps will still kick in and work.

I would put on 12 batteries that are connected to battery charger, this would keep batteries charged whenever gen is used or power comes back on ( even on intermittent basis).

If money is tight, consider taking all your lawn mower, motorcycle, ATV, boat ... batteries in during the fall or winter and getting them set up for spring backup use.

We all change out our car batteries every three or four years and I keep the old ones nd use for another four plus years for these types of thing. Every so often I charge them up or put on trickle charger. I sue as backup to generator battery, for quick boost of a battery.

Ask a neighbour for their old batteries

I also find them a great source of power to power lights, computers, TV, radio.. during power outage and when gen is turned off. Heck, it not a great unit for piping hot coffee but if you love coffee, go buy a 12 volt marine coffee maker! If you get a pot of coffee from an old battery, it’s better then a kick in the head and you will still have power left over to power to recharge a flashlight, a small LED lamp... what the heck, you paid for them, so use them to their max

And the other thing is, even if you do not have a water problem, these old battery’s will be of help to you during a power failure and you wish to give the genny a break or are low on fuel. Coupled with a few solar panels and there’s lots of juice to be had for essentials.

Clarence
Canada
Posts: 966
Joined: Sun Sep 10, 2017 2:13 am
Location: Ottawa area, Ontario
Contact:

Re: Flooding (mitigation + safety tips)

Post by Clarence » Sun Nov 24, 2019 7:03 pm

Add on note to large capacity marine bilge pumps. When looking at gallons per hour try and find info on vertical rise or lift capacity. Most small yacht hulls are only a few feet below water level and only need to lift water up for three to maybe five feet. So after purchasing one, put it to the test and if satisfies, go buy more. You will want a number of them. Many are 800-1200 gallons per hour.

To avoid waiting for sump pit to fill up, throw a weighted one in a lake.. and set so it’s eight feet deep and check what’s coming out

Also to avoid water seeping back in to easily, buy enough hose to discharge the water downhill and away from the home.

Clarence
Canada
Posts: 966
Joined: Sun Sep 10, 2017 2:13 am
Location: Ottawa area, Ontario
Contact:

Re: Flooding (mitigation + safety tips)

Post by Clarence » Mon Feb 17, 2020 4:23 pm

Here In eastern Ontario we have a pretty good base of snow and we are getting more. By what I see in my bush, amount of snowmobile activity flying by, I say we have as much on the ground as last year. If not, getting close. So it will all depend on how fast it melts with sun,rain... but it may be another high flood mark for the people who depend on hydro dams to control water flow.

Last years flooding in Ottawa was not blamed on flood control ( of course it would t) but if one looks at levels at the dams in mid summer, one can see that water levels were still high. So for this simpleton, it was all about preventing ontario water, flooding out quebec.

So for those in eastern Ontario, I wouldn’t count on any change from those in charge of water levels. Best get backup batteries, generators, sump pumps, marine badge pumps all ready to go. Also, given the poor history of management, it really would be wise to look at either jacking the old house up or selling it.

Increased development around the cities, adds more asphalt, large roofs from mega stores, denser home building, smaller lawns to absorb water... as we all know or should know, water needs to go somewhere and seeing as it tends to go with gravity, rivers and collecting lakes will flood. No one in Ontario or in particular, Ottawa is going to increase flooding in montreal and upset those folks.

So jack the house up or move. Or one can continue to pump and replace carpets and drywall. I have a hunch, insurance companies may get tired of bailing ( no pun intended) people out. Then what people do to unload their home?

thecrownsown
Topic Leader
Canada
Posts: 838
Joined: Sun May 27, 2012 10:27 pm
Location: SW Ontario, ON

Re: Flooding (mitigation + safety tips)

Post by thecrownsown » Tue Feb 18, 2020 9:26 pm

Weird.

I would say its the opposite in my end of the province. Proper water shed management, better and increased civil infrastructure and monitoring by conservation authorities have had mitigated virtually all of the issues from even a generation ago. There will always be the exception to the rules, the 50 year and 100 year storms but overall...severe flooding is not as common and largely relegated to areas of older infrastructure that has yet to be updated.
https://www.internationalpreppersnetwork.net/viewtopic.php?f=57&t=7738

Clarence
Canada
Posts: 966
Joined: Sun Sep 10, 2017 2:13 am
Location: Ottawa area, Ontario
Contact:

Re: Flooding (mitigation + safety tips)

Post by Clarence » Wed Feb 19, 2020 1:11 am

That’s awesome crown, I was referring to all the folks who for past three or four years in the ottawa,and surrounding north west cottage county are experiencing flooding. Kemptville and manotick had floods for years but someone woke up and lowered the water into ottawa river. Of course it drains into quebec dams and if they don’t lower then it backs Up! Then there’s the thousands along st Lawrence river from Kingston Down to quebec border that were under water. I witnessed docks unusable in June! Weird indeed. As to floods of 100 years, that’s a deceptive statement used by gov to excuse inaction or poor planning from the get go. But if you believe things are getting better in your area, that’s awesome. I would still plan for the day they screw up and we all know that is a likely event.

The floods are a result of poor planning by home owners, governments and utilities who obey governments for political purposes and maybe for money. News flash to all, snow does fall in canada, same for rain and it doesn’t obey silly town planners. Build in low areas is not best planning, especially when you notice water marks on old trees, a little bit of research...

The other thing that I am very sure is going on is all the tile draining going on with, again the blessing of planners. Fields drain super fast and all this rain rushes to fill creeks, rivers etc

All around me, farmers are cutting down health forests and tile draining the land to plant corn or soybeans! Mass change in coverage and instead of snow melting slowly, it fills the tile systems and hits the creeks...

So piss poor planning from all levels of government, greed from developers and complicit governments ( may help with campaign finances) homeowners who want waterfront but refuse to look around them or read accounts of all the past floods, greed and surprise, surprise, Canadian snow and rain in the spring.

You live where there’s snow, you best not plan to build a flat roof, live in fire prone region, best not have combustibles for many hundreds to thousands of feet near your home, build at base of a mountain, best consider avalanches, build in arid area, best rethink filling the pool or growing almonds etc etc etc.

It’s one of the reasons, I wish “normall people would actually listen to what the prepping community is mainly about. We can live beside water.... but one needs to be intelligent about it, plan for it... rather simple if one uses a brain.
Hope the people you helped last spring got their stuff together and are not counting on you and taxpayers bailing them out again.

Post Reply

Return to “General Preparedness”