Ask a leader livestock, farming and gardening questions here

Discussions about how to grow your own food or raising livestock.
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farmgal
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Re: Ask a leader livestock, farming and gardening questions

Post by farmgal » Tue Sep 09, 2014 11:16 pm

Racoon is possible but so is fisher, I would trap the area and see what you get..


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Re: Ask a leader livestock, farming and gardening questions

Post by OldTimeGardener » Tue Sep 09, 2014 11:44 pm

Could even be a local smaller dog looking for 'entertainment' or a free meal.

Princess Auto (if you have one there) had traps of all sizes at reasonable prices.
Live traps so if it's someone's 'pet' then you can release it.
Or best yet, find the owner and make them aware of what sweet little pooch is up to, that could cost them $'s if pooch is successful in getting in there.

If not at pet, then you can still take care of it.

Good luck.
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Denob
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Re: Ask a leader livestock, farming and gardening questions

Post by Denob » Wed Feb 17, 2016 5:25 pm

So yesterday's weather created a lot of issues.
Here, we got about 6" of snow followed by freezing rain, followed by rain, back to freezing rain....you get the picture.
Because the temps were above zero for a while then dropped overnight, my chicken run floor is now a sheet of ice!
Any advice on how to melt that...or even if I should?

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Re: Ask a leader livestock, farming and gardening questions

Post by farmgal » Wed Feb 17, 2016 6:22 pm

Hello Denob,

If you have it, I would recommend a couple inches of peat moss over the ice and then your normal bedding about a inch or two on top of that.. the peat will absorb the water as it melts, heat up and compost in place.. and just keep the top bedding up so they have a dry footing to walk on, and they will roast up high, no way to melt out the floor without way to much work. The peat moss will do all the work for you when it warms up and melts out. the birds will dig it though and it will make amazing compost for garden use down the road.
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Denob
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Re: Ask a leader livestock, farming and gardening questions

Post by Denob » Wed Feb 17, 2016 8:21 pm

farmgal wrote:Hello Denob,

If you have it, I would recommend a couple inches of peat moss over the ice and then your normal bedding about a inch or two on top of that.. the peat will absorb the water as it melts, heat up and compost in place.. and just keep the top bedding up so they have a dry footing to walk on, and they will roast up high, no way to melt out the floor without way to much work. The peat moss will do all the work for you when it warms up and melts out. the birds will dig it though and it will make amazing compost for garden use down the road.
Thanks FG...I have to go out to the Co-op tomorrow to replenish my salt and calcium chloride supplies so I'll pick up a bale then.
How would peat moss work as winter bedding inside the coop?

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Re: Ask a leader livestock, farming and gardening questions

Post by farmgal » Wed Feb 17, 2016 9:10 pm

I keep a bale of peat moss in the coop as their winter dust bath, as they use it, it gets worked into the main floor bedding, which helps keep it drier around drinkers and it keeps the bedding a bit lighter and when mixed with other more normal bedding, it helps add bulk to what will be used in the garden. I would not only it, as it can be to dry and dusty on its own.
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Denob
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Re: Ask a leader livestock, farming and gardening questions

Post by Denob » Wed Feb 17, 2016 10:59 pm

ok...suppliment...got it!
Thanks FG!!!

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Re: Ask a leader livestock, farming and gardening questions

Post by RedDawn » Sun Sep 04, 2016 8:06 pm

Keeping the Fox (critter) out of the Hen House:
Electric Fence (various sizes) teaches critters who's Boss. Solar power and battery does fine.
Low Tech is a dog. Certain types work great for chicken coop, or garden.
Rooster is used to protect the coop too.
Failing that, inflate small balloons and tie to area.
Then wait up with pellet rifle. hehehe.

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Re: Ask a leader livestock, farming and gardening questions here

Post by helicopilot » Thu Jul 13, 2017 3:27 am

Question!

So, I've tried Googling "purple dots on my plant leaves" and I'm surprised the RCMP has not tuned up on my property yet...

From the beginning of the spring, I've noticed that some of the weeds in my garden (hint, that's what I was inferring in Google...) had purple/red spots on the leaves. I thought it was just one kind of weed that was susceptible to that whatever-it-is.

Now, some of my beets are also have those spots.

1) What is it?
2) How bad is it?
3) What should I do????
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Denob
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Re: Ask a leader livestock, farming and gardening questions here

Post by Denob » Thu Jul 13, 2017 8:25 pm

DO NOT TAKE THE PURPLE DOTS!
ANYONE WHO HAS TAKEN THE PURPLE DOTS SHOULD REPORT TO THE MEDICAL TENT IMMEDIATELY...
ALL OTHER RECREATIONAL TREATS ARE CONSIDERED SAFE...
PLEASE ENJOY THE REST OF THE CONCERT HERE IN WOODSTOCK!

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