Martial Arts

Discussions about Security and Defense
jamesmcknulty
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Re: Martial Arts

Post by jamesmcknulty » Tue Sep 16, 2014 2:17 am

I trained Taekwon do for a year and for me it helps a lot when it comes to self defense.


“Honey in his mouth, push dagger in his heart”

OttawaLoneWolf
Posts: 55
Joined: Fri Jun 21, 2013 8:26 am

Re: Martial Arts

Post by OttawaLoneWolf » Sun Nov 23, 2014 6:19 am

Multifarious wrote:I've just started Krav Maga. So far I like it. I think it's a realistic self defence system. I like how there are no competitions. Personally, as a woman, I would prefer to learn how to break someone's face and get away than to learn how to do fancy kicks and holds... It empowers me and gives me a sense confidence in my ability to take care of myself. I recommend it to everyone. :)
who is your instructor and which federation ?

Krav Maga has been water down due to commercialization. Some schools are good ? some schools are just horrible.

Knuckle

Re: Martial Arts

Post by Knuckle » Sun Nov 23, 2014 7:27 pm

I have looked at this thread a few times and wondered if I should respond. That is likely due to much of my fighting skills are unorthodox and often I've I been labelled a dirty fighter after having then just won. I did take Judo from the age of 11 to 16. I achieved a blue belt and felt it was a sport that often only was effectual against another in Judo. Kids my age overall were totally into Bruce Lee movies and scrapping was something we did alot just goofing around anyways.

My friends father had been a serious boxer for much of his life and thus raised his 5 boys in the school of kickass! These were my friends! I didn't seem to have the built in abilities to box as well as these friends and thus when I was taking a decent beating, I'd often resort to applying the nut kick as a survival reflex. This somehow evened the playing field and thus I could then win a round or two. Seems my philosophy therefore later became more about finding the weak link in my opponents armor and this initial discovery lead me down another path then many would not choose.

I joined the Military Police at 18 and was told I was the shortest MP they hired in many years at 5' 7". Once again I was considered the easy prey to many others and the majority therefore usually underestimated me which is what I preferred anyways. The MP training is designed to separate the weak from the pack and from a class of 40, 24 remained to graduate on my course. Many of these dropouts occur due to sustaining injury from dislocations of the arms at elbow or shoulder. The overall mindset in this training was to still be standing at the end of the class. To stay down was considered poor sportsmanship and often you were punished if you opted for that choice. We were constantly told that soldiers are trained fighters and thus we MP's had to be better trained to make them understand that there are still consequences for those who disobey...destroying an arm was often the way to quickly end a fight and thus we practiced doing such...alot!

I found that MP's did two things well, drink and fight! And if there was no one else to fight, we often then fought each other. This does not go well when you might have to rely upon that same person the following day in a bar brawl. We were so popular on base that we had to have our own bar to drink at as if we tried to enter the junior ranks bar off duty, it wouldn't be long before we were fighting for our lives and drastically outnumbered. I think most soldiers can testify to their love for the MP's!

I liked fighting probably because it is something I was good at. I sucked at hockey, baseball and all that other stuff. Fighting to me was sorta like a game of chess (with penalties). The trick is to plan a few moves ahead just as in chess. You can pick on a specific point such as the forward leg while of course keeping distance and pretending your focused elsewhere as you set up your opponent. A few strikes to the leg makes the opponent shift to another less comfortable stance and now you have your opponent fighting somewhat off balance to what their used to. As they try to protect such weak spots, you set them up where they expose critical strike points to take them down. This is how I played and often how to win!

Those who have a variety of martial arts training and not mix them up even while sparring seems dumb from my perspective. This is likely why I would never compete as I use all weapons in my arsenal, no matter the rules. No contact fighting teaches one to pull their punches and these inbred habits later interfere when you need it most. The folks I sparred with were serious fighters too and we often fought until blood was drawn or an injury occurred.

Ratts knew me back then too and sometimes socially sparred with me while just visiting. I say that in the politest sense as this is usually full contact sport so the social part is just slapping your opponent to show them their openings in their defenses. These are not gentle slaps and often they are aimed at ear drums to disable your balance as it screws with your equilibrium(dangerous too as you can blow the eardrum if enough force is used). No, we were not like "fight club" but you still shouldn't play if your not willing to pay! This is not something we did after a few drinks for courage. This is something we did to stay sharp for those times that you don't usually see things coming until your in it!

So would I suggest other folks to practice like this too? The aggressive part of me (now hiding in the shadows these days) still says "hell yes" while the logical controlled side I now try to draw upon says I should tell all of you instead to trust in God as we likely won't come out of this next battle unless HE intervenes anyways.

I'm now old enough that I can injure myself just from throwing some haymakers simply at nothing as my shoulder joints scream from such things now. My left hand is also suffering from arthritis from past broken fingers from poorly aimed shots. Dislocating ankles 3 times put a stop to spin kicks some 20 years back but for all those younger pups out there who want to experience a little MP training, just try doing a few pushups on your wrists with palms facing up as we had to do these in sets of 20 at a time in the army. They'd tell us it built up your wrist muscles for us practicing the wrist bends... I think it just built up one's endurance to pain! 8-)

OttawaLoneWolf
Posts: 55
Joined: Fri Jun 21, 2013 8:26 am

Re: Martial Arts

Post by OttawaLoneWolf » Mon Jun 22, 2015 8:52 am

Hello friends

here is a video of my military Krav Maga instructor course -
I find Serbian really got their training done right.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=toeB6hAg8HE

OttawaLoneWolf
Posts: 55
Joined: Fri Jun 21, 2013 8:26 am

Re: Martial Arts

Post by OttawaLoneWolf » Mon Jun 22, 2015 8:58 am

Knuckle wrote:I have looked at this thread a few times and wondered if I should respond. That is likely due to much of my fighting skills are unorthodox and often I've I been labelled a dirty fighter after having then just won. I did take Judo from the age of 11 to 16. I achieved a blue belt and felt it was a sport that often only was effectual against another in Judo. Kids my age overall were totally into Bruce Lee movies and scrapping was something we did alot just goofing around anyways.

My friends father had been a serious boxer for much of his life and thus raised his 5 boys in the school of kickass! These were my friends! I didn't seem to have the built in abilities to box as well as these friends and thus when I was taking a decent beating, I'd often resort to applying the nut kick as a survival reflex. This somehow evened the playing field and thus I could then win a round or two. Seems my philosophy therefore later became more about finding the weak link in my opponents armor and this initial discovery lead me down another path then many would not choose.

I joined the Military Police at 18 and was told I was the shortest MP they hired in many years at 5' 7". Once again I was considered the easy prey to many others and the majority therefore usually underestimated me which is what I preferred anyways. The MP training is designed to separate the weak from the pack and from a class of 40, 24 remained to graduate on my course. Many of these dropouts occur due to sustaining injury from dislocations of the arms at elbow or shoulder. The overall mindset in this training was to still be standing at the end of the class. To stay down was considered poor sportsmanship and often you were punished if you opted for that choice. We were constantly told that soldiers are trained fighters and thus we MP's had to be better trained to make them understand that there are still consequences for those who disobey...destroying an arm was often the way to quickly end a fight and thus we practiced doing such...alot!

I found that MP's did two things well, drink and fight! And if there was no one else to fight, we often then fought each other. This does not go well when you might have to rely upon that same person the following day in a bar brawl. We were so popular on base that we had to have our own bar to drink at as if we tried to enter the junior ranks bar off duty, it wouldn't be long before we were fighting for our lives and drastically outnumbered. I think most soldiers can testify to their love for the MP's!

I liked fighting probably because it is something I was good at. I sucked at hockey, baseball and all that other stuff. Fighting to me was sorta like a game of chess (with penalties). The trick is to plan a few moves ahead just as in chess. You can pick on a specific point such as the forward leg while of course keeping distance and pretending your focused elsewhere as you set up your opponent. A few strikes to the leg makes the opponent shift to another less comfortable stance and now you have your opponent fighting somewhat off balance to what their used to. As they try to protect such weak spots, you set them up where they expose critical strike points to take them down. This is how I played and often how to win!

Those who have a variety of martial arts training and not mix them up even while sparring seems dumb from my perspective. This is likely why I would never compete as I use all weapons in my arsenal, no matter the rules. No contact fighting teaches one to pull their punches and these inbred habits later interfere when you need it most. The folks I sparred with were serious fighters too and we often fought until blood was drawn or an injury occurred.

Ratts knew me back then too and sometimes socially sparred with me while just visiting. I say that in the politest sense as this is usually full contact sport so the social part is just slapping your opponent to show them their openings in their defenses. These are not gentle slaps and often they are aimed at ear drums to disable your balance as it screws with your equilibrium(dangerous too as you can blow the eardrum if enough force is used). No, we were not like "fight club" but you still shouldn't play if your not willing to pay! This is not something we did after a few drinks for courage. This is something we did to stay sharp for those times that you don't usually see things coming until your in it!

So would I suggest other folks to practice like this too? The aggressive part of me (now hiding in the shadows these days) still says "hell yes" while the logical controlled side I now try to draw upon says I should tell all of you instead to trust in God as we likely won't come out of this next battle unless HE intervenes anyways.

I'm now old enough that I can injure myself just from throwing some haymakers simply at nothing as my shoulder joints scream from such things now. My left hand is also suffering from arthritis from past broken fingers from poorly aimed shots. Dislocating ankles 3 times put a stop to spin kicks some 20 years back but for all those younger pups out there who want to experience a little MP training, just try doing a few pushups on your wrists with palms facing up as we had to do these in sets of 20 at a time in the army. They'd tell us it built up your wrist muscles for us practicing the wrist bends... I think it just built up one's endurance to pain! 8-)

spend 12 years with the Army Reserve ( Artillery & Armor Reccee ) and Reg ( Artillery school ). All the senior NCOs are probably same age as you. Crusty, hard as F@ck. For whatever reason, they all build differently and fight differently. I think our generation ( I am 31 ) and newer generation got influenced too much by MMA and UFC......yes we are definitely more athletic and healthier but we don't know the meaning of cruel and brutality as the older generation.

Judoka
Canada
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat Mar 10, 2018 7:00 pm

Re: Martial Arts

Post by Judoka » Sat Mar 10, 2018 9:03 pm

25 years between jujustu and judo
some Krav Maga
Hapkido
Jeet Kune do
Kali/ escrima
taken pressure point control tactics several times
Taught Judo and Jujutsu and self defense courses

The arts all have something to teach, they all have plans and skills that are of no real use. The most important factor is the practitioner and state of mind, NOT the art. All individuals regardless of training can be dropped by the right (lucky) technique from a rank amateur. One of the key factors to training is to learn to control the adrenaline surge, that said no practice ever simulates the adrenaline surge of real life vs death encounter. But practice and thought help you prepare. Learning martial arts gives you more choices to develop your personal toolbox. But too little training makes you inflexible and begin to think a given technique will work. There is no technique in any art that is always effective, if there was there would be only the one technique. Every fight is a risk, every situation is unique.

Learning -you cannot learn this from a book or video effectively. You cannot learn effectively with compliant partners. It takes time to become a flexible thoughtful fighter, meaning you can change your attack and defense on-th-fly without getting "stuck" in a mode of thought. For me this was always most relevant looking at young people learning ground fighting and being determined to "hunt" for a strangulation or armlock. All fighters get this idea that they will have a plan and execute it. NO battle plan survives contact with the enemy - this is true on a battlefield or any individual conflict (unless you are inordinately lucky, but don't let one go to your head!)

My 2 cents (but we dont make pennies anymore!)

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Wayne
Canada
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Joined: Wed Dec 07, 2016 9:24 pm
Location: Nova Scotia

Re: Martial Arts

Post by Wayne » Sun Mar 11, 2018 11:50 am

I've been interested in the martial arts since I've been 16 years of age. For the following 20 years, I was a bit of a fanatic and studied a number of systems and styles. My studies included:

1 year Shotokan
1 year Judo
2 years Goju-rue
2 years Jujutsu
16 years Wushu

After this, I basically stopped learning, although I continued to teach which included a year at the Ontario Police College in Alymer as a Physical Training/Self-Defence Instructor.

I believe that every system has something of value to teach a student. It requires a high level of physical fitness and dedication to progress.

What I've experienced is that since the 70's the requirements have gone down hill. Many students have the goal of achieving a black belt and with the commercialization of Dojos, they have tended to punch-them-out on an assembly line. One Dojo in Toronto guaranteed a Black Belt in 3 years at a time when it would normally take seven to complete. Because of this, this level of accomplishment can't be a measure of actual ability, This is not to say that the ability and skill isn't there, but it's no longer the guarantee that it once was...
None you improvise, one (or more) is luxury.

scrounger
Canada
Posts: 558
Joined: Sun Oct 14, 2012 12:53 am

Re: Martial Arts

Post by scrounger » Tue Mar 13, 2018 9:09 pm

Wayne,

What level of belt/ranking would 16 years of Wushu training get you?
I reserve the right to be a blowhard. Blaster

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Wayne
Canada
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Joined: Wed Dec 07, 2016 9:24 pm
Location: Nova Scotia

Re: Martial Arts

Post by Wayne » Wed Mar 14, 2018 10:42 am

scrounger wrote:Wayne,

What level of belt/ranking would 16 years of Wushu training get you?
The Chinese Martial Arts Duanwei System (level of black sash) may vary somewhat from country to country. It cannot be directly compared to the Dan (Japanese) system of black belt grading.

Evaluation is based upon on each individual’s years of martial arts training, age, mastery of techniques and theories, ethics, contribution to the development of martial arts and a comprehensive evaluation system of skill level. I am 5th Duan (an intermediate degree.) The Advanced degrees require that you attain the previous rank for a minimum of 5 years. The highest degree is 9th Duan and can only be issued at age 60 (8th at 50). The Chinese apply a 'life-long learning' concept and respect those older... :-)
None you improvise, one (or more) is luxury.

tazweiss
Canada
Posts: 625
Joined: Sat Dec 17, 2011 6:17 am

Re: Martial Arts

Post by tazweiss » Wed Aug 08, 2018 6:53 pm

I received my Black Sash in Kung Fu in 1984. From there I dabbled in boxing, Shotokan, Jiu Jitsu, Arnis and Krav Maga. As for actual fight experience, somewhere north of 400 street fights and bar fights. I enjoyed all of them but over the years I adopted 5 rules for fighting, which didn't sit all that well with the instructors when I took Krav Maga. Apparently, I'm too aggressive, but those rules have done me good.
Those who are unwilling to defend freedom, will become unfree.

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