New Member Introductions

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Wayne
Canada
Posts: 698
Joined: Wed Dec 07, 2016 9:24 pm
Location: Nova Scotia

Re: New Member Introductions

Post by Wayne »

Hi Ted. Welcome!


None you improvise, one (or more) is luxury.
thecrownsown
Topic Leader
Canada
Posts: 860
Joined: Sun May 27, 2012 10:27 pm
Location: SW Ontario, ON

Re: New Member Introductions

Post by thecrownsown »

LaserTed wrote:Hello Canada from sweltering Minnesota!

Well hello there!
https://www.internationalpreppersnetwork.net/viewtopic.php?f=57&t=7738
Chi-prepper
Canada
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Apr 19, 2019 2:38 pm

Re: New Member Introductions

Post by Chi-prepper »

Glad to have found this site. Anyone here from Central NB ?
LAZ 1
Canada
Posts: 26
Joined: Mon Apr 22, 2019 7:57 pm

LAZ 1 checkin' in

Post by LAZ 1 »

As a long term Prepper, I am encouraged by how, these days, Prepping and Self Sufficiency seems to have become "main stream". Back when I started, us people formerly known as "survivalists" had a stigma attached to them … aka too many were wearing cammo [ perhaps with matching underwear and pajamas ? ], a tin foil hat, with a room full of gunsNammo. The last prepping event I attended in Denver was indeed MAINSTREAM, with multi tiered marketing franchises, people in suits, and more gear available for sale than I could carry away in my motorhome. There were also multiple information and training seminars available. I did enjoy the "Shoot Room" set up inside a trailer, and learned a few valuable lessons about CCW shoot/no shoot split second decisions in dynamic scenarios.

Prepping is now a very mature, sophisticated scene …
the times indeed are a changin'.

I have been "prepping" since my teen years, and for the last decade, since retiring, I have been living the dream as a Gentleman of Leisure, with Winters in Mexico, Summers in BC, Canada. I refer to myself mostly as a SNOBIRD, or an OVERLANDER, or a vagabond/Gypsy/Van Lifer … with prepping as a side dish. In simple terms, I live in the present, one day at a time, treat each day as if it might be my last, EMBRACING THAT ONE DAY. I do keep an eye on future trends, but do not spend too much energy second guessing what might happen next. I maintain a few set appropriate responses available to a few most likely SHTF scenarios, but I definitely do not obsess over this.

I am now elderly, so my survival skills are oriented in different directions than "ffight or flight". As my primary survival skill, I try to get along with others. Also, I try to offer a certain unique skill set that might be useful to a community. When I say I am experienced as a prepper, it ain't no BS. If you can find the premier Issue of SURVIVE magazine, my name was on the masthead as a contributing editor. I have written a book on how to make your own backpacking equipment, THE BUDGET BACKPACKER, WIN PRESS, 1977. I have been the outdoors editor for a Northern BC newspaper, with a weekly column. And, I have contributed articles to outdoors magazines and newspapers. For the last few years, I have been living almost full time in an Mini Motorhome I built on the back of an AWD Astro van.

Note the part where I mentioned, I BUILT THE MOTORHOME MYSELF.

I am a great believer in self sufficiency, and in DO IT YOURSELF … as a lifestyle, and for specific projects. I have taught formal classes on DIY gunsmithing, making your own outdoors equipment, and mentored individuals on other topics. BUT, I never refer to myself as an "EXPERT". My opinions are based on my personal needs, life style, and experience, which may or may not have any relevance to you. So if you like my ideas, feel free to copy or steal them. If not, feel free to respond explaining why these ideas do not work for you, and maybe even offering constructive criticisms or perhaps improvements? This forum is for sharing ideas, opinions, and perspectives …
hopefully a rich dialog rather than a bunch of monologs.

So, my first real opinion, is that too many preppers, rely on gear rather than experience and expertise.
eg; just because you bought the best guitar in the music shop, it don't make you a rock star.

And, just because you bought a gun and some ammo, it don't make you a gun fighter. If you have not fired at least 1000 ( carefully aimed ) rds through your firearm, at realistic targets, perhaps even moving targets, with TACTICAL reality the primary guideline, then you are still a beginner. Only when INSTINCT takes over control, can you be considered competent. And please do not confuse the terms "Practical Shooting Games" with "Tactical Shooting". There are vast differences between the two …
some of the habits you learn for the games are NOT safe in the real world.

HOWEVER,
ALSO PLEASE NOTE,
In the survival/ self sufficient / prepper community, I see way too much emphasis on guns, Guns, GUNS!!!. I say this as a former Canadian Infantry Officer. Military scenarios require military type firearms, MILITARY tactics [ which pre-suppose unlimited free ammunition readily available for training and resupply in the field] with real world results revealing a hit ratio of 1 in 10,000. For those of you who have dreams of being Rambo … an Army of One … you are deluding yourselves. Military tactics are all oriented around TEAMWORK, and for most civilians, unless you happen to have a highly trained team to back you up, trying to use similar tactics will almost inevitably lead to suicide .

After I retired from the military, I got a license as a gunsmith and as a firearms dealer. I got a Concealed carry permit for the US. I took up "Practical Shooting" as a recreation. I spent over a decade competing in IPSC matches, and other forms of runNgun. I have shot hundreds of thousands of rounds through hundreds of guns. I got pretty good at it, competed in the Canadian Championships several times, once as a member of the BC team. And after all that practice, these days I own ONE [ ONLY ONE ] gun. And I rarely use it.

WHY?
Because a gun is only a very small part of prepping, self sufficiency, and survival. Admittedly, there are times when having a gun can make the difference between life or death. Realistically, I have come closer to death many more times from personal stupidity than from gunfighting. I am 70 years old, with an active life spent in the outdoors, and in some shady spots, and there have only been a very few times where having a gun made the difference. Needing a gun and not having one, is definitely not as good as having a gun and not needing one [ BTDT both ways ] but honestly, guns are NOT a magic wand you wave around to make your problems disappear …
unless you are dreaming about starring in your very own Western or a Dirty Harry movie.

SO,
final comments,
I am NOT an EXPERT,
but I do have decades of experience with firearms, as a soldier, as a practical shooting competitor and as a gunsmith building custom PRACTICAL firearms for competitors and real world clients.

If you need SPECIFIC suggestions as to your firearm requirements, feel free to ask SANE questions.

Do not be like the SURVIVALIST type customer who showed up at our gun shop one morning,
asking
"What is the best gun to shoot my neighbors with?".

TRUE STORY,
and just one example of how crazy and overblown some people can get about guns.

LAZ 1
(;-[)
LAZ 1
Canada
Posts: 26
Joined: Mon Apr 22, 2019 7:57 pm

Homeless? Vagabond? Bug Out Vehicle? Or just a Daily Driver? Life in the sand and on the beach?

Post by LAZ 1 »

First of all, even though I call myself a minimalist, at my age, I deserve to be COMFORTABLE while "roughing it" outdoors. Especially if the trip will be extended for weeks or months.These days, I absolutely need a nice thick mattress. Sleep is important, perhaps critical, not just for comfort.

I also require adequate carrying capacity. Since I no longer own a permanent home, when I hit the road, EVERYTHING I own comes along for the ride, including food and water for at least a month, survival gear, camping gear, tools, repair parts, and any recreational gear I might want. AWD or 4X4 is a necessity, especially on some of the overgrown abandoned logging roads in BC, or the low hanging branches and the narrow cobblestone streets in old town Mexico, and other places along " the road less travelled" that I like to explore.

In my AWD MINI MOTORHOME
I HAVE LIVED FULL TIME FOR MONTHS,
and honestly it was OK. But without adequate drinking water on board, you are limited in duration. And water is heavy. One big fresh water tank is not the ideal solution fora few good reasons.
I prefer several plastic 5 gal containers, and a supply of bleach for purifying any on site water. Bleach is infinitely cheaper than complicated water filters, and more reliable in the long run.

As mentioned, I routinely carry about a month of food, mostly canned, a 25 lb bag of rice, and buy fresh food locally when available. Things like canned salmon, corned beef, canned fruits and vegetables, soups, etc combine to make a varied diet. Lots of spices along to perk up the meals. I also carry a special antiseptic designed to rinse fresh vegetables and fruit in.

This advice is geared towards long term OVERLANDING, but much will apply to a bug out vehicle. Of course, for bugging out, a STEALTHY vehicle will be more desirable for tactical reasons. Which is why I would choose my AWD Safari van, which looks like a slightly lifted stock rig, over my SHINY ALUMINUM CHECKERPLATE AWD Astro Mini Motrorhome.

If you need any more advice on OVERLANDING, bug out vehicles, camperising vans, living in Mexico, or related topics, feel free to reply.
LAZ 1
2018-11-23 04.22.47.jpg
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Last edited by LAZ 1 on Tue Apr 23, 2019 7:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
LAZ 1
Canada
Posts: 26
Joined: Mon Apr 22, 2019 7:57 pm

Re: New Member Introductions

Post by LAZ 1 »

dE9DZgFl.jpg
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2005 AWD SAFARI Camper van ... stealth
2005 AWD SAFARI Camper van ... stealth
2018-11-23 04.22.47.jpg (146.17 KiB) Viewed 3035 times
HopeImReady
Canada
Posts: 446
Joined: Mon Feb 24, 2014 11:47 pm

Re: New Member Introductions

Post by HopeImReady »

Welcome LAZ 1. I like your attitude :) Especially the point about getting along with people - highly underrated. Nice skills, too..not many can say they built their own motorhome. Dog looks very relaxed as wel l ;)
HopeImReady
"The thing about smart mother f*ckers, is that they sometimes sound like crazy mother f*ckers to dumb mother f*ckers." -Abraham .”
Newbie Prepper
Canada
Posts: 1
Joined: Sun Jun 09, 2019 7:58 pm

Re: New Member Introductions

Post by Newbie Prepper »

Hello from Vancouver, British Columbia
Peaks
Canada
Posts: 9
Joined: Mon Dec 09, 2019 1:38 am

Re: New Member Introductions

Post by Peaks »

Greetings to everyone from Ottawa. Long time lurker, first time poster. I have gathered lots of valuable info from this site and wanted to tell you how much I appreciate it (and all of you!)

I feel like prepping is always about learning. I’m not where I want to be, but I try everyday. While stocking up and acquiring stuff are important things to do, I also want to learn new skills. My Go bag is my constant companion.

Anyway, thanks again and looking forward to joining the conversation.
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Denob
Site Admin
Canada
Posts: 2889
Joined: Sat Jan 29, 2011 9:35 pm
Location: Quebec, Canada
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Re: New Member Introductions

Post by Denob »

Welcome Peaks!
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